I enjoyed Jared's book immensely, so it was rather a shock to find the addendum so shallow and, particularly, so depressingly pessimistic. He manages in one brief article to scotch any possibility of arms control, and to argue convincingly in favor of "the race to the bottom". For examples of the latter he could hardly have picked two more convincing cases than the American beer and food-processing industries. The purveyors of tasteless instant-grown chickens, antibiotic-saturated beef, elastic tomatoes, and paper-mache Washington State apples, not to mention massive groundwater pollution in the coastal states, are apparently to carry all before them. Fortunately, there are other countries than Japan with whom the comparison could be made, and many of them produce tasty foods efficiently. Even Diamond seems to recognise that American beer has carried the virtues of mass production beyond reasonable bounds, as a glance at the shelves of the local supermarket with its array of multiethnic and microbrewery products would confirm.
This is a fantastic article and it really has given me help. I want to go to this thing in the summer called Creation Fest and it has music and speackers to celebrate God and it costs a lot! I was looking for help and I found this. $100+ seems easy at first but then your stuck when your my age. Thanks a whole bunch and I will probably come back again.
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