If you love to travel and find yourself randomly searching for airfare sales or browsing Lonely Planet, why not carve out a niche for yourself as a private travel agent? My friend, Mark Jackson did just that, making extra money online with his travel consulting side business. Start with word of mouth recommendations from friends who know they can count on you for the cheapest flights, and then move on and create a Facebook or LinkedIn group to invite people who want to stay on top of the latest deals. Eventually you could spin this into a full-time consultancy teaching people how to make their dream trip a reality.
You’re already broke, and your car just conked out. Or maybe you’re cash-strapped until next week’s payday, but you’re short on rent, can’t make the minimum payment due on your credit card bill, or simply forgot you need to chip in for a birthday gift. When you’ve run out of money, there’s an endless number of reasons why you might need cash – quick.

Protect yourself: In the end, you also need to protect yourself and your wealth, from yourself (doing something stupid with your savings) and others. Insurance, legal corporations, rainy day savings funds, tax shields and so on, there are many ways how you can protect yourself and your wealth. If you’re asking from what? From accidents, the government, market melts, sneaky salesmen and even from yourself is the answer.

Thank you for sharing this post again from 2017. When I saw the article, Oh, it’s been written in 2017 but when I read along, it is still applicable up to now. I noticed that you are not eliminating the dates on your post. Some bloggers recommend to use a plugin to delete the dates so Google don’t have to read the post as outdated anymore. I saw that you are not doing that — or you are updating your old articles one by one before sharing it again?
Manage social media for businesses. If you have a knack for social media, you could potentially get paid to manage various platforms for others. Many businesses are too busy running day-to-day operations to stay on top of their Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest accounts – and will pay someone with the knowledge and time to do it for them. To find these jobs, ask local businesses and check sites like UpWork.com and Problogger.net.
Anthony Robbins often says that success is the product of one of two scenarios: inspiration or desperation. There's massive credence to that statement. Clothier was desperate. He had no choice. He wasn't willing to settle for a life of mediocrity, so he figured it out and marched forward, applying persistent action every single day, getting better and better.
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I couldn’t disagree more. The concept of systematic saving and hoping for a solid average return in the markets isn’t something that I believe in anymore. I’m 32, and have been investing in the markets since I was 18, under the assumption that if I set up automatic contributions throughout my life I would ultimately be “rich”. I started by maxing out my SEP-IRA and then by maxing my Roth. I invest monthly in a range of products, again, all with the goal of cost averaging the market to my benefit over time. Fast forward 14 years from when I began, and I have accumulated less than $60k. My invested dollar amount exceeds my current total, as it did even at the recent market highs in 2007. In other words, investing for the long haul doesn’t work like it used to, particularly for my generation. The first decade of wage earning is the most important in terms of compounding interest, and we have just experienced a completely lost decade. The hopes for recovery to make up for that lost decade (14 yrs in my case) do not appear reasonable. David
My wife picked up immediately on the problem of "weapons of mass destruction" — to use the euphemistic cliche. Are we to sit back and accept that the regulation of such things is inevitably going to fail, and that we are somehow wickedly misguided to try, putting ourselves in the anachronistic position of the Japanese samurai class, vis a vis guns, or the Chinese emperors and navies? Or can we accept that really novel dangers have to be met with really novel approaches?
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