In particular, in addition to the review of my book by Bill Gates, I've received a lot of correspondence from economists and business people, who pointed out to me possible parallels between the histories of entire human societies and histories of smaller groups. This correspondence from economists and business people has to do with the following big question: what is the best way to organize human groups and human organizations and businesses so as to maximize productivity, creativity, innovation, and wealth? Should your human group have a centralized direction, in the extreme having a dictator, or should there be diffuse or even anarchical organization? Should your collection of people be organized into a single group, or broken off into a number of groups, or broken off into a lot of groups? Should you maintain open communication between your groups, or erect walls between them, with groups working more secretly? Should you erect protectionist tariff walls against the outside, or should you expose your business or government to free competition?

My use of the word "secrets" in the title of this article might have brought you here hoping for a guaranteed, almost magical solution to make you wealthy. There isn't one. The fundamental objectives are simple: Make more than you spend, and use the excess to invest wisely. How you invest is up to you (with a few caveats below), but the obvious goal is to make investments that have a high likelihood of making you more money in the future. That's it. The ways to achieve this are by making more money, spending less, and investing more wisely.
But rich can also be psychological richness. It is an achievement of being able to live without the worry of money. You don’t necessarily need to own a castle to be considered rich. Everyone can be rich as long as we are able to do what we desire freely and to have the fulfilment in life. The key of it is to live with or even less than what you have. To be “normal” even when you are financially capable to do a lot more.
My belief is that you should focus on buying value on the things you enjoy, and you should focus on making big wins to reduce your expenses on non-essentials and things which don’t bring you joy. For example, in our family eating out is a treat.  We save a lot of money by not dining very often.  But, when we do dine out we focus our efforts on nights where kids eat free.  Not only do we save money this way, but if my son decides that tonight’s dinner choice is not high on his list of priorities, we didn’t waste money on a meal.  This takes the financial tension out of any wasted food and allows my wife and I to enjoy the meal more.
all your advice works. i know because i have followed those steps since my early to mid-20s when, as a self-employed freelance journalist, i opened what was then called a keough account. those were pre-cursors of today’s ira’s. i always socked the limit into those, and soon opened an ira, as well as a 401k and a roth when they became available. i also opened fidelity and later, vanguard, mutual fund accounts. i always saved more than i spent, probably at least half my pay, which was never higher than about $65k during all the years i worked in journalism. true, my friends always liked to joke that i was “cheap,” but who’s laughing now? i crossed the $1m line in late 04, quit full-time work at age 51 and do exactly as i please with myself today, which is mainly being a semi-pro musician, the career the i almost established when i was in college. mercifully, i don’t have to live off it today. my main advice is to avoid credit-card debt. i am always astonished by how much people carry. ive never carried any. my debts are always limited to mortgage and, at times, car loans. i could own fancier cars and houses, but i have never felt the need, unlike my cash rich, but investment-poor friends. i live off corporate junk bonds today, plus music and random freelancing. my goal is to get to about $1.5m, get 80 percennt out of today’s way too unstable stock market, and live off mostly fixed income investments. way down the road, ill add social security, and a pension from the 25-years-plus i worked in newspapers. it can be done. the millionaire-next-door exists all around us.
Another benefit of giving to charity is that people perceive you as a better person when you give to causes they care about. They are likely to trust you more when they see that you aren’t intent on hoarding the money they give you, and that doing so will benefit their community in turn. Of course, the tax benefits of giving to charity are also a great incentive to do so.
My wife picked up immediately on the problem of "weapons of mass destruction" — to use the euphemistic cliche. Are we to sit back and accept that the regulation of such things is inevitably going to fail, and that we are somehow wickedly misguided to try, putting ourselves in the anachronistic position of the Japanese samurai class, vis a vis guns, or the Chinese emperors and navies? Or can we accept that really novel dangers have to be met with really novel approaches?

This is a true classic in my opinion on not merely how to get rich but how to be rich as the title suggests.Mr.Getty espouses the inherent believe or rather conviction that wealth is far greater than what price a person put's upon himself or the principles that govern this thought but that as a man values himself is the ultimate litmus of his true worth.
I enjoyed Jared's book immensely, so it was rather a shock to find the addendum so shallow and, particularly, so depressingly pessimistic. He manages in one brief article to scotch any possibility of arms control, and to argue convincingly in favor of "the race to the bottom". For examples of the latter he could hardly have picked two more convincing cases than the American beer and food-processing industries. The purveyors of tasteless instant-grown chickens, antibiotic-saturated beef, elastic tomatoes, and paper-mache Washington State apples, not to mention massive groundwater pollution in the coastal states, are apparently to carry all before them. Fortunately, there are other countries than Japan with whom the comparison could be made, and many of them produce tasty foods efficiently. Even Diamond seems to recognise that American beer has carried the virtues of mass production beyond reasonable bounds, as a glance at the shelves of the local supermarket with its array of multiethnic and microbrewery products would confirm.

While droves of individuals salivate over the ability to live, work and play anywhere in the world that they chose to, most are primarily fixated on the ability to just earn a bit of money online. One stream of revenue would likely make the world of difference to many folks. But doing that seems to be an ever-increasing technical challenge. So it isn't about getting rich for a large degree of people, but rather, finding a way to earn just a little bit more money without all the added time it might take.
The result is that Japanese food-processing industries are not exposed to domestic competition, they're all local monopolies, they're not exposed to foreign competition, and they don't learn the best methods in the international trade for producing food. And the result is that, in Japan, Japanese beef costs $200 a pound. My wife and I had heard about that before we went to Japan, but what we did not realize until we were brought into a supermarket by my wife's Japanese cousin is that chicken in Japan costs $25 a pound. The reason the Japanese can get away with that is that Japanese chicken producers are not exposed to competition with super-efficient American chicken producers.         

We're in an explosive era of growth. Thanks to the birth of the internet and our newfound global connectivity, generating a real income online, no matter where you live or what you do, has become a modern-day convenience. Gone are the doldrums of 9-to-5 employment and the necessity to head into a life-sucking corporate job. Today, the so-called "dream" revolves around the lifestyle entrepreneur, able to make money, travel the world and live life to the fullest from anywhere on the planet.

How do we account for these cultural losses and non-inventions of Tasmanian society? Flinders Island was even more extreme — that tiny society of 200 people on Flinders Island went extinct several millenia ago. Evidently, there is something about a small, totally isolated human society that causes either very slow innovation or else actual loss of existing inventions. That result applies not just to Tasmania and Flinders, but to other very isolated human societies. There are other examples. The Torres Strait islanders between Australia and New Guinea abandoned canoes. Most Polynesian societies lost bows and arrows, and lost pottery. The Polar Eskimos lost the kayak, Dorset Eskimos lost dogs and bow drills, and Japan lost guns.         
Protect yourself: In the end, you also need to protect yourself and your wealth, from yourself (doing something stupid with your savings) and others. Insurance, legal corporations, rainy day savings funds, tax shields and so on, there are many ways how you can protect yourself and your wealth. If you’re asking from what? From accidents, the government, market melts, sneaky salesmen and even from yourself is the answer.
There’s plenty of work and clients to be found. If you know where to look. To start, you need to know if there is enough demand for your skill to make it worth the effort to go out looking for work. Start by searching for freelance postings on sites like Flexjobs, SolidGigs, Contena, greatcontent or one of the dozens of other skill-specific freelance job boards.
It occurred to me that you’re probably interested in growing your blog. I might be able to help. I’ve done video editing (http://www.fakesamplesite.com) and PowerPoint design (http://www.anotherfakesite.com). Imagine doing a great video on using virtual assistants, then distributing it through your newsletter. I could do one for you in about 2 days if you’re interested.
I first learned about you when I downloaded your free e-book, How to Make Money – BLOGGING, via Amazon Kindle. It was a sure one-sitting kind of book but is very meaty. I got all the wonderful ideas from your book and finally decided to visit your website to harvest some more inspiration. I am so glad my path was directed here because I also have just started my incognito blog.
Hi Danielle – I presume you have a website or blog? If so, the easiest way to start is by signing up for an affiliate site, like Commission Junction. They represent hundreds of companies offering affiliate programs. But you can also contact companies directly, preferably those who’s products and services you actually use. Most company’s have affiliate programs now, so you can try signing up that way. They’ll give you a coded link to place on your site that will credit you for the sale when a reader clicks through to their site and makes a purchase.

Need more ideas on how to make money online? Another strategy is using webinars to market your product, service, or course. I’ve done webinars to promote my financial planning practice and to drum up interest in my online course for financial advisors. With a webinar, you’re basically offering a lot of tips and advice for free — usually in a live format. At the end though, you pitch your paid product or service with the goal of securing a few deals.
You can charge up to $995 for a service, but many if not most gigs still start at just $5 (of which you make $4), so the key to making money on Fiverr is either working in volume or offering custom add-on services. But it’s free, easy, and quick to get started, and payment happens fairly quickly, so if you’re able to whip up a logo or business card design without much effort, it’s not a bad way to cash in on your creative skills.
That might be why we have on-demand everything. We live in a society where fast food is prevalent and exists on nearly every corner or town across the United States and we're able to access all of the world's information in real time from anywhere we want from little pocket super computers. We can hail rides, find dates and do everything in a flash, instantaneously. Clearly, we want to lose weight and get right quickly and not have to wait, purely because our ids are so powerful.
The Id -- The id is the first part of the human mind that's formed. It's the basal and instinctive urges that drive us towards instant gratification, and it's hardwired into our genetic conditioning to eat, procreate and defecate, for example. The id creates the sudden urges of wanting what we want, and wanting it right now. Children are all born with the id until the other parts form, and if we were only left with the id, we would do, act, and say as we pleased all the time and anytime.
Spending intentionally doesn’t require pinching every penny, but you should know where those pennies are going and that the destination is something you value, whether that’s travel or good food. It’s easy to fall into a habit of doing the opposite, basically a financial version of mindless eating — buying a new pair of shoes because you walked by the shoe store, for example.

If you’ve got gift cards lying around that you never manage to use – maybe you’ve got $50 to Longhorn Steakhouse, but you’re a vegetarian – you can sell them at a discount through gift card exchange sites such as CardCash.com. Once the site receives and verifies the balance on the card (e-cards are obviously handy, but they’ll pay for you to mail in physical gift cards), you can get paid in as little as two days.
There are plenty of books on making money by men who haven't made much. But if J. Paul Getty, who Fortune magazine called “the richest man in the world,” doesn't know how, who does? Here the billionaire businessman discloses the secrets of his success—and provides a blueprint for those who want to follow in his footsteps. And he goes beyond the matter of making money to the question of what to do with it.
Turn your photographs into cash via sites like Fine Art America, which lets you upload your images to sell as prints, t-shirts, phone cases and more. Other marketplaces for photographers include SmugMug, 500px and PhotoShelter. Some sites require a subscription but may provide features ranging from cloud storage to password-protected galleries and a customized website.
Just be sure to put a lot of care into your product listings. Everything from the titles you use, to how effective the description is at convincing potential buyers your product is better than the rest, and even taking care to shoot high quality product photos can have a dramatic impact on your sales. I recommend using photo editing tools like Fotor, which gives you the ability to edit your images, create captivating graphic designs and more.

Anthony Robbins often says that success is the product of one of two scenarios: inspiration or desperation. There's massive credence to that statement. Clothier was desperate. He had no choice. He wasn't willing to settle for a life of mediocrity, so he figured it out and marched forward, applying persistent action every single day, getting better and better.
Get started. If you want to become a millionaire, you need to decide to do it and get started. If you are not able to save money right now because of debt or other financial obligations, you should work on those issues first. A good place to start is with Dave Ramsey’s Baby Steps. This is a tried and true method for setting up an emergency fund, paying down debt, and beginning your investments. Once you have that started, you can begin your million dollar journey.

If you want to clear some space out in your house and have a big stack of books you’ve been holding onto for too long, you can make money selling your books and textbooks online. Stores like Half Priced Books and others will give you cents on the dollar for each of your current books while you can check what your book is worth by simply entering the ISBN number on Book Scouter.


What a huge, great list of ideas – bookmarked this as I know I’ll be coming back to go over it again and again. Here’s another item that could have made the list. I found a financial directory that’s useful for info on making money online. It’s http://money.madbeetech.com. What I like about it is that each directory listing includes ebooks and videos that can be instantly downloaded. All sorts of stuff for people who have their own website, and people who don’t (but still want to make money online).

OneOpinion— signing up is completely free, as it should be. This survey site, like many others, works on a points system: 1,000 points = $1. Once you reach 25,000 ($25), you can choose to cash out via PayPal or an Amazon gift card. OneOpinion also offers product testing, which means you have the opportunity to test new products at home before they hit the market.


Now, I know what you’re thinking. Most of the software and apps you use on a regular basis are made by massive companies or established development studios. Well, yes. But many successful apps, particularly those in the Apple and Google stores, are created and marketed by individuals and small businesses. In fact, independent developers made $20 billion in the App Store in 2016 alone.
However, Clothier's tale is an epic one. He had succeeded almost his entire life, and from very early on. But when failure hit home and he was unable to recreate his arbitrage business on his own, the reality of the situation sunk in. With $4,000 left to his name, he happened upon an infomercial teaching real estate. It cost him $1,000 for that program, which was 25% of his net worth at the time. Petrified, he made the plunge.
To understand these losses in extreme isolation, the easiest case to understand is Japan, because the loss of firearms in Japan was witnessed and described. It took place in a literate society. Guns arrived in Japan around 1543 with two Portuguese adventurers who stepped ashore, pulled out a gun, and shot a duck on the wings. A Japanese nobleman happened to be there, was very impressed, bought these two guns for $10,000, and had his sword-maker imitate them. Within a decade, Japan had more guns per capita than any other country in the world, and by the year 1600 Japan had the best guns of any country in the world. And then, over the course of the next century, Japan gradually abandoned guns.
Not quite ready to start your own blog, but still like the idea of getting paid to write? You may want to consider trying your hand at freelance writing. Many bloggers and website owners are willing to shell out some serious cash for high quality writers. In fact, Holly Johnson from ClubThrifty.com makes over $200,000 per year from freelance work! And she has a course that teaches others how to do the same.

the problem with “CashCrate” is that the amount of money that u get out of it is VERY slim.. and even to get that VERY slim portion of money you have to complete a lot of surveys and to cash-in on the money you earned u must make over $20, trust me. i tried it, it took me over 6-12 months to get the cash.. i used the site like if my life depended on it. it was very hard.
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