There are quite literally hundreds of clever ways to make money online. From taking online surveys, to renting or selling your old clothes, flipping your iPhone to someone in a different country, and even buying low-cost products locally, just to resell them for a higher price on Amazon. There’s truly no shortage of unique ways to make money online.
Rent out a parking spot. If you live in a busy or congested area and have parking to spare, you might be able to rent out your parking space for some quick cash when you’re not using it. Simply advertise your open parking space online including details on the location, whether it’s covered or uncovered, and your desired hourly, weekly, or monthly fee. If you want, you can even use a site like Just Park or download the Spot App to reach more potential customers.
Skillshare: Want to teach people things but don’t want to make them publically for free? Skillshare is a platform that allows people to create online courses to help others and if people use your course, Skillshare will pay you. Want to learn from other creators? There isn’t a better place on the internet. Skillshare comes built-in with an audience interested in learning online.
If you have a fondness and talent for taking pictures you can make extra money online by becoming a stock photographer and selling your images to a stock photo company like ShutterStock or iStockPhoto. You’ll get royalties every time someone licenses an image you’ve submitted. To really be successful, build your own photography website to be able to showcase your portfolio and start getting higher-paid private corporate work.
Okay, let's now start to apply all this to what we should do if we want to try to go out and get rich. Let's apply this to some affluent modern industries and companies. I'll give you two examples. The first example concerns that image of productivity that we Americans have as we look toward Japan. We fantasize that the industrial productivity of Japan and Germany is greater than that of the United States. And that's not true. On the average, American industrial productivity is higher than the industrial productivity of either Japan or Germany. But that average figure conceals differences among the industries of the same country, related to differences in organization — and those differences are very instructive. Let me give you two examples from case studies carried out by the McKinsey Corporation, an economics study industry based in Washington. These two examples involve the German beer industry and the Japanese food-processing industry.
One evening, late at night, during an infomercial, his prayers were answered. He discovered a system for wholesaling real estate and that's where he spent the $1,000 to grab it, at the time, being 25% of his net worth. However, within a matter of 21 days, he was able to use what he learned in that system to make $8,200. And although he had been making over a million dollars a year just several years before, that $8,200 meant the world to him.

The other lesson that I would like to draw from history concerns what is called the optimal fragmentation principle. Namely, if you've got a human group, whether the human group is the staff of this museum, or your business, or the German beer industry, or Route 128, is that group best organized as a single large unit, or is it best organized as a number of small units, or is it best fragmented into a lot of small units? What's the most effective organization of the groups?

Rent out a room in your home to travelers. If you live in a city or a popular vacation spot, there are probably lots of people passing through looking for a place to stay for a night or a couple of weeks. Even if you don’t live somewhere with a lot of traffic, you can still use a rental website to find people who are willing to pay to stay in your home.[7]
Buy and sell domain names. If you’re good at finding popular yet undiscovered domain names, you can make some cash on the side by buying and reselling websites. Think of it as digital real estate speculation. Domains are available on GoDaddy.com for as little as $2.99 per year, but are sometimes resold at far higher prices: According to Business Insider, the site MM.com sold for $1.2 million dollars in 2014. Once you find the perfect domain name to resell, you can market it on Flippa.com for a flat fee.
We need to get this out of the way first, and besides, maybe you haven’t thought of this because you’re in complete panic mode. Check the sofa cushions, your pants pockets, old coats in the closet, and your car, where spare change may have fallen between the seats. If you haven’t ransacked your home lately and cleaned yourself out, there’s got to be some money lying around.
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