Complete errands or tasks for the elderly. Older people often need help with buying groceries, cleaning their home, performing home maintenance, and paying bills. To find clients, contact your local community center or church to find out if anyone needs help. Additionally, you might post an ad in your local classifieds or talk to people you know to find out if they know someone who needs help.[5]
There’s plenty of work and clients to be found. If you know where to look. To start, you need to know if there is enough demand for your skill to make it worth the effort to go out looking for work. Start by searching for freelance postings on sites like Flexjobs, SolidGigs, Contena, greatcontent or one of the dozens of other skill-specific freelance job boards.
It is the same concept of being the top of a particular field. When you are the best at something, you find that opportunities come to you. To become an expert of something, it is crucial to never stop improving. Successful people invest time, energy, and money in improving themselves, and it might just be the most rewarding investment you can ever make.
If you wish you had a little more money in your pocket, you’re not alone. Fortunately, you have a variety of options when it comes to making money. Doing odd jobs is a quick and easy way to earn money. Similarly, reselling items or selling items you make can earn you extra cash. As another option, earn money online by writing a blog, freelancing, or doing online surveys.
Hunt for under-priced used books that you can sell online. Download an app that reads ISBN numbers so you can scan the barcodes on books. This will pull up the book’s current price on Amazon so you can see if it’s worth trying to resell it. Then, visit used book stores, thrift stores, and garage sales to look for high value books. Post the books for sale online using sites like Amazon or Ebay.[9]
While droves of individuals salivate over the ability to live, work and play anywhere in the world that they chose to, most are primarily fixated on the ability to just earn a bit of money online. One stream of revenue would likely make the world of difference to many folks. But doing that seems to be an ever-increasing technical challenge. So it isn't about getting rich for a large degree of people, but rather, finding a way to earn just a little bit more money without all the added time it might take.

Tim, I know several millionaires, and most of them have done it the old fashioned way, which is working and saving over many years. Some have started their own businesses, some have made wealth through other means such as investments and real estate, and some have done it other ways. Virtually all of the millionaires I know have families (some were married without children, but most had children). I’ve never counted how many millionaires I know, but of the people I know for certain, I would venture to say that I know at least 10-15 of them would qualify under these standards. As for the college education part of it, I’ve never taken a poll to find out how many had degrees and which degree they had, if they had one.
Whether it’s an important consumer application, a specialist app to solve a particular niche problem, or even a time-wasting game you can play on your phone, you can create a massively successful business if you build software that helps people. (Look at the rise of Slack—the team communication software that went from side project to billion-dollar company in just 2 years.)
According to what I read it is much easier than ever before to become a millionaire nowadays. There are more millionaires now than it’s been. And this is mostly attributed to the home values in the past years. Home equities and rising appreciation of real estate makes it possible to a lot of Americans to be considered millionaires. However, the past two years the real estate market has been hit hard, home values have depreciated back into the 2003 level.

My wife picked up immediately on the problem of "weapons of mass destruction" — to use the euphemistic cliche. Are we to sit back and accept that the regulation of such things is inevitably going to fail, and that we are somehow wickedly misguided to try, putting ourselves in the anachronistic position of the Japanese samurai class, vis a vis guns, or the Chinese emperors and navies? Or can we accept that really novel dangers have to be met with really novel approaches?

×