all your advice works. i know because i have followed those steps since my early to mid-20s when, as a self-employed freelance journalist, i opened what was then called a keough account. those were pre-cursors of today’s ira’s. i always socked the limit into those, and soon opened an ira, as well as a 401k and a roth when they became available. i also opened fidelity and later, vanguard, mutual fund accounts. i always saved more than i spent, probably at least half my pay, which was never higher than about $65k during all the years i worked in journalism. true, my friends always liked to joke that i was “cheap,” but who’s laughing now? i crossed the $1m line in late 04, quit full-time work at age 51 and do exactly as i please with myself today, which is mainly being a semi-pro musician, the career the i almost established when i was in college. mercifully, i don’t have to live off it today. my main advice is to avoid credit-card debt. i am always astonished by how much people carry. ive never carried any. my debts are always limited to mortgage and, at times, car loans. i could own fancier cars and houses, but i have never felt the need, unlike my cash rich, but investment-poor friends. i live off corporate junk bonds today, plus music and random freelancing. my goal is to get to about $1.5m, get 80 percennt out of today’s way too unstable stock market, and live off mostly fixed income investments. way down the road, ill add social security, and a pension from the 25-years-plus i worked in newspapers. it can be done. the millionaire-next-door exists all around us.
In 2014, Caitlin Pyle made over $43,000 by working as a freelance proofreader…part time. When she wasn’t working, she even had time to go on several fun vacations. After she had a ton of success doing that, she decided she wanted to teach others how to do the same thing, so she started up Proofread Anywhere. Sign up for one of her free workshops to learn more about making money as a proofreader.
The average Uber driver is said to make about $19 to $21 an hour after tolls and some other expenses are factored in — although I’ve seen other numbers suggesting it’s closer to $16, and with Lyft, the average is said to be less (closer to $11). But on the plus side, you can generally get your money instantly, which wasn’t always the case with these ride-sharing businesses.

Start by taking other courses you’re interested in: Not only is this important competitor and opportunity analysis, but it also gives you an idea of how a course could or should look and feel. What’s the pacing like? Is it via email, video, in-person chats? Once you understand how you want your course to look, it’s time to decide what it should include. Those same courses are a great starting place. How can you make your course better or more interesting? Do you have experience others don’t?
Not only do you need a source of income, but having a second income is a great idea as well. I don’t mean that you have to have an additional part-time job, but find a way to make a couple of extra bucks on the weekends or a few nights during the week. This could be anything from freelance work to selling homemade goods on Etsy. Making an extra hundred bucks every month could have a huge impact on your millionaire journey. It may not seem like a lot, but it can really add up every year.
Okay, let's now start to apply all this to what we should do if we want to try to go out and get rich. Let's apply this to some affluent modern industries and companies. I'll give you two examples. The first example concerns that image of productivity that we Americans have as we look toward Japan. We fantasize that the industrial productivity of Japan and Germany is greater than that of the United States. And that's not true. On the average, American industrial productivity is higher than the industrial productivity of either Japan or Germany. But that average figure conceals differences among the industries of the same country, related to differences in organization — and those differences are very instructive. Let me give you two examples from case studies carried out by the McKinsey Corporation, an economics study industry based in Washington. These two examples involve the German beer industry and the Japanese food-processing industry.
In his first 18 months after that real estate infomercial and learning the arbitrage strategy, he did 91 wholesale deals and made a million dollars. He didn't need to use any of his cash to do it. He simply replicated the same technique he utilized in the grocery industry, but instead, did it for the real estate industry. And the results were unfathomable, allowing him to generate millions of dollars, almost on demand, while also becoming one of the leading internet marketers in the world, building up a massive list.
The music industry might not be as strong as it was in the 80s, but there are still plenty of ways to make money online as a musician. Sites like SoundBetter let you sell your services as a songwriter, producer, or session musician to thousands of customers a month. While Musicbed, Music Vine, Marmoset, and SongFreedom are perfect for licensing your music to TV shows, movies, and web series.

Invest in real estate. Relatively stable assets like rental properties, or potential development land in a steadily growing area is a good way to build wealth. As with any investment, there are no guarantees. Many people, however, have done quite well with real estate. Such investments are likely to appreciate in value over time. For example, some people think that an apartment in Manhattan is almost guaranteed to increase in value over any five-year period.
Ebates is another cash back app, similar to Dosh, and right now they are offering a $10 signup bonus. There’s no rule saying you can’t have multiple cash back apps, so why not sign up for a couple just so you get the bonuses? Once you get your bonuses, then just use whichever app gets you the best deal on your upcoming purchases. Easiest money ever!
Or again, what about the contrast between Microsoft and IBM? Again, since my book was published, I've acquired friends at Microsoft, and I've learned about Microsoft's organization, which is quite distinctive. Microsoft has lots of units, with free communication between units, and each of those units may have five to ten people working in them, but the units are not micro-managed, they are allowed a great deal of freedom in pursuing their own ideas. That unusual organization at Microsoft, broken up in to a lot of semi-independent units competing within the same company, contrasts with the organization at IBM, which until four years ago had much more insulated groups. A month ago, when I was talking in the industrial belt of North Carolina, the Raleigh-Durham area industrial belt, I met someone who is on the board of directors of IBM, and that person told me, Jared, what you say about IBM was quite true until four years ago: IBM did have this secretive organization which resulted in IBM's loss of competitive ability, but then IBM acquired a new CEO who changed things drastically, and IBM now has a more Microsoft-like organization, and you can see it, I'm told, in the improvement in IBM's innovativeness.
Just wondering how many people you know personally, that saved and invested, especially if they made minimum wage, weren’t college educated, had a family to support, etc. and became as you say, ‘filthy rich’ by following the principles of this page? People read simple-minded articles and poor things, if they are simple-minded enough to believe the garbage.
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