If you want to be a millionaire, it helps to know what you want, and then have the discipline to go after it. When you set a goal, you focus on it and pursue it. This means that you don’t get sidetracked by less important matters. If you know that you need to set $1,000 a month aside in order to meet your millionaire goal within an allotted timeframe, you focus on that. You cut expenses or, better yet, look for ways to increase your income, so that you can meet your goal. Sometimes it’s not fun, but millionaires usually stick with it.
Another way to utilize your talent and business skills is to run corporate workshops online. Businesses are always looking for unique ways to help educate their workforce, and if you can package your talents into a day or half-day long session, you can sell that to companies all over the world to make money online. Start by building a portfolio and then reaching out on LinkedIn to influencers at relevant companies to see if they would be interested in you teaching their team.
Zilok is free for individual members to create listings, but rental businesses have to pay fees. To list your item on Zilok, you’ll have to create a post with a description, photos and a price per day. Once a renter finds your product, Zilok takes a commission depending on the listing price. For everything under $10, the commission fee is $1. Fees range between 5% and 9% for all other price categories.

Mow lawns or plow driveways. If you’re willing to mow yards or shovel or plow snow in the winter, you could easily start your own snow removal and lawn mowing business on the side. While you can usually find work by reaching out to your local community via word-of-mouth, flyers, or online message boards, the website Plowz & Mowz allows you to set up an online profile and reach more customers in your area.
Reduce your utility bills. Electricity, gas, and other utilities can deeply impact your monthly budget if you let them. So don't. Be smart about ways to keep your home cool during the summer and warm during winter. You may even consider investing in or building solar panels to channel the sun's natural energy into electricity. Keep your utilities low, and watch the money you save start to mount.
Use your bank’s overdraft protection if you need to make a purchase. If you have a checking or other account with overdraft protection, you might be able to intentionally overdraw on the account and take advantage of the temporary payment, when you are in need of quick cash. The bank will initially cover the cost, but you will have to pay it back.[27]
Remember the steps from point 2: Make more money, spend less, and invest wisely. Point 3 covered making more money, and this one covers spending less. Make a detailed budget for yourself based on your projected income and your current expenses. Set firm limits for your expenses, and keep a close eye on where most of your money goes--you might be surprised at some of the areas where you waste the most money. Once identified, you can start refining your budget to spend as little as possible, and funnel the rest into a savings or investment program.

Tenants sounds good, but can be a toxic problem as I recall before of one studying Religion and Ministry somewhere and claimed to be clean and laid back, but came to light by another tenant he stayed with to have a bad temper, bad attitude and never clean up his own dishes and have his stuff scattered in living room without first discussing with his roommate and always asked other roomie for rides and money as a moocher and would get pushy if his roomie refused as unable to at times.
Rent out a room in your home to travelers. If you live in a city or a popular vacation spot, there are probably lots of people passing through looking for a place to stay for a night or a couple of weeks. Even if you don’t live somewhere with a lot of traffic, you can still use a rental website to find people who are willing to pay to stay in your home.[7]
Robert said he did an average of 4-6 of these gigs per year for a while depending on his schedule and the work involved. The best part is, he charged a flat rate that usually worked out to around $100 per hour. And remember, this was pay he was earning to advise people on the best ways to use social media tools like Facebook and Pinterest to grow their brands.
Another option that isn’t quite cash back but is along the same lines of “make money by saving money” — the Honey Chrome extension. Whenever you head to your cart to check out, Honey searches for online coupon codes or better deals from different retailers. That means no more wasted time Googling “[insert store name] coupon code” just to come up empty-handed. Honey does all the legwork for you!
I have cleaned house, done dog sitting and sold items I no longer need. I have complimented my retirement income by about $ 1000 a year paying for a plane ticket, rental car, bed and breakfast, food and attraction tickets for a 3 to 4 day trip. It gives me something to really look forward to. I always pay taxes on the service income I make. Always give value.
Robo-advisors are diversified investment accounts that are automatically managed by a computer algorithm (as opposed to a human money manager). If you want to invest, but don’t have the money, or don’t want to invest with a money manager, robo-advisors are for you! Robo-advisors make investing easier—and cheaper—so they’re perfect for new investors.
Now let's finally apply these lessons to comparing different industries or industrial belts within the United States. I mentioned that when I was growing up, Route 128 outside of Boston led the world in productivity for an industrial belt, but Route 128 has now fallen behind Silicon Valley. Since my book "Guns, Germs, and Steel" was published, I've spent a lot of time talking with people from Silicon Valley and some from Route 128, and they tell me that the corporate ethos in these two industrial belts is quite different. Silicon Valley consists of lots of companies that are fiercely competitive with each other, but nevertheless there's a lot of collaboration, and despite the competition there is a free flow of ideas and a free flow of people and a free flow of information between these companies that compete with each other. In contrast, I'm told that the business of Route 128 are much more secretive, and insulated from each other like Japanese milk-producing companies.
My wife picked up immediately on the problem of "weapons of mass destruction" — to use the euphemistic cliche. Are we to sit back and accept that the regulation of such things is inevitably going to fail, and that we are somehow wickedly misguided to try, putting ourselves in the anachronistic position of the Japanese samurai class, vis a vis guns, or the Chinese emperors and navies? Or can we accept that really novel dangers have to be met with really novel approaches?
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