This is a true classic in my opinion on not merely how to get rich but how to be rich as the title suggests.Mr.Getty espouses the inherent believe or rather conviction that wealth is far greater than what price a person put's upon himself or the principles that govern this thought but that as a man values himself is the ultimate litmus of his true worth.
And while you’ve probably heard of selling sperm or eggs, don’t get your hopes up: Yes, the young and the healthy can sometimes earn good money as sperm or egg donors, but such opportunities require extensive screenings and long-term commitments. Donating blood (sans plasma), meanwhile, is a great and altruistic thing to do, but you generally won’t get money for it.

Getty illustrated the purpose and value of having money. He reviews three different mentalities toward work, toward achieving and investing one's time. Basically, it's how you spend your time. Do you spend it working for other people, going home at the end of the day being like everyone else? Do you rise to the top, investing in what you do, in hopes that if your company succeeds, you do? Do you work for yourself? Create? Invest in yourself, for yourself? The book begged the question, "Who are you in terms of your values with wealth?" Very philosophical. Do you help others with it? Stockpile it and not help a soul? Do you blow it all? Do you save? It only means what it means to you. I like this book. I liked Getty.
Something many self-made wealthy people have in common is that they are valuable in specific ways. Even when millionaires and billionaires are taken out of the equation, many rich people — doctors, engineers, filmmakers — have gotten rich after adding value to themselves and then adding value to the world. For example, a rich neurosurgeon may be specially talented and skilled. This surgeon added value to the world after improving their own skills and quality of life.
When an airplane leaves from one city to the next, it has a plan. Its plan is called a flight plan. It's a massive action plan that involves speed, altitude, direction of travel and many other facets. But what happens when there's turbulence or air-traffic congestion or it needs to change course for some other reason? The plane changes its plan. But it doesn't change its goal of where it's going. Create and follow a plan, and don't be afraid to change it if you see something isn't working.
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