The last step resides in the concept of contribution. Even if you have no money, find a way to contribute to others. Look for opportunities where you can help those around you. Whether they're in need or not, this mindset will drive home the point that you have more than you need, even if you physically don't. Search for ways, every single day, where you can contribute either your time or your money to those who might be less fortunate, because that's the true essence of success in every form.
We all wish we could be wealthy. For most of us, it's a far-off dream that someday, eventually, we might be able to turn ourselves into self-made millionaires. But the truth is, building wealth isn't about putting all your hopes into "someday." You're never too old to start building wealth, but if you start when you're young, you have far greater potential to amass a fortune--and more time to let that fortune compound itself as you grow older.
I enjoyed Jared's book immensely, so it was rather a shock to find the addendum so shallow and, particularly, so depressingly pessimistic. He manages in one brief article to scotch any possibility of arms control, and to argue convincingly in favor of "the race to the bottom". For examples of the latter he could hardly have picked two more convincing cases than the American beer and food-processing industries. The purveyors of tasteless instant-grown chickens, antibiotic-saturated beef, elastic tomatoes, and paper-mache Washington State apples, not to mention massive groundwater pollution in the coastal states, are apparently to carry all before them. Fortunately, there are other countries than Japan with whom the comparison could be made, and many of them produce tasty foods efficiently. Even Diamond seems to recognise that American beer has carried the virtues of mass production beyond reasonable bounds, as a glance at the shelves of the local supermarket with its array of multiethnic and microbrewery products would confirm.
Blogging is something that requires patience, persistence and discipline. It may mean writing everyday for over a year before you really start to see any money from it. There are exceptions to the rule, but from my dealings with other bloggers, it seems to be pretty common to spend one or even two years building your blog, your brand and your authority, before making any serious amount of money.
The prep work before you open up shop is more time-consuming. You need merchandise to sell, photos and descriptions to post, a name for your shop and a business plan to help you succeed. Once that’s done, you’ll still need to find customers. Depending on what you’re selling, that could take weeks, which is why you should expect the overall time for this gig to be slow.
Next, you need to set up and build your YouTube channel. Your YouTube channel is your homebase for all your content. If you already have a Google account for Gmail or Google Drive, then you can use that to log-in to YouTube and start setting up your channel. Pick a username that works for you and is memorable (if you’re using an existing Google account you’ll have to edit your username in Google+).

Earn cash back for shopping. Earning cash back on your purchases is a smart idea, and credit card rewards aren’t the only good cash-back strategy out there. With sites like ShopAtHome.com, eBates.com, and TopCashBack.com, you can earn up to 10% cash back on purchases made with approved merchants. Many frequent shoppers also love the Ibotta app, which lets you earn cash-back on every purchase.
5. Fiverr – Fiverr is a great place to make a few bucks or spend a few bucks if you need some of the services people offer. Basically, everything is $5. You either pay $5 or charge $5. They call them “gigs.” You can offer your services however you choose. If you sell art and you’re fine selling pieces for $5 each, that’s a gig. If you’re a graphic designer and you want to offer your services for $10/hour, simply offer a 30 minute gig. If they need two hours of graphic design, they pay you $20, or $10/hour by buying four gigs.
It turns out that the German beer industry suffers from small-scale production. There are 1,000 little local beer companies in Germany, shielded from competition with each other because each German brewery has virtually a local monopoly, and shielded from competition with imports. The United States has 67 major beer breweries, producing 23 billion liters of beer per year. Germany has 1,000 major beer breweries, producing only half as much beer per year as the United States. That's to say that the average brewery in the U.S. produces 31 times more beer than the average brewery in Germany.
×