This is my update, it’s been a couple years and I feel now is a good time for one! After my wife and I turned 30 in July I have been thinking about updating our story. We continue to prosper at what we do and have been pretty frugal since when we first posted. I finally got a raise and a promotion , which is just the start of our good luck. About two years ago we purchased land back home in PA even though we still have time left in Boston. We got an amazing deal on 2.2 acres on a golf course that now appraises for $350,000. Since the last time we spoke we have paid down debt,we have paid off both cars, my wife’s medical loans and under grad degree, also purchased about $25,000 in gold and silver. We have about $55,000 in equity in our condo in Boston and together we now have over $95,000 in 401k and Roth accts. We are working extra hard at paying down the land loan so that we will have enough equity to build a 1.5 million dollar house ($300,000) needed or 20%. We also just signed with a private practice which is going to pay my wife and I a $50,000 signing bonus and over $250,000 before taxes a year, starting in 2014. We make about $175,000 a year combined now but once my wife becomes partners at this practice she is expected to make over $750,000. So we are very lucky and well on our way! We our currently half way away to a million. Our plan is to become millionaires before we turn 35. Can we do it? Thank u Ryan for your advice. Work hard, it doesn’t matter what you make… It matters what you are able to save!
Do you enjoy fast food or going into retail shops? Many companies hire mystery shoppers to test the customer service of their stores. A common one is Subway, which hires mystery shoppers to ensure that "Sandwich Artists" are following all the franchise guidelines. If you have time and can travel to different places, this could be a good side hustle.
Look, I know it’s not always realistic to pull these off; I personally wouldn’t bother trying. But if you’ve got a ton of stuff lying around — not outright junk, but stuff you don’t need, like the aforementioned DVDs and kid’s clothes — it’s worth a try. Advertise on Craigslist and put up signs in your neighborhood, then come Saturday haul a table out to your driveway (assuming you have a driveway), load it up with stuff for sale, and take whatever you can get.
So these stories of isolated societies illustrate two general principles about relations between human group size and innovation or creativity. First, in any society except a totally isolated society, most innovations come in from the outside, rather than being conceived within that society. And secondly, any society undergoes local fads. By fads I mean a custom that does not make economic sense. Societies either adopt practices that are not profitable or for whatever reasons abandon practices that are profitable. But usually those fads are reversed, as a result of the societies next door without the fads out-competing the society with the fad, or else as a result of the society with the fad, like those European princes who gave up the guns, realizing they're making a big mistake and reacquiring the fad. In short, competition between human societies that are in contact with each other is what drives the invention of new technology and the continued availability of technology. Only in an isolated society, where there's no competition and no source of reintroduction, can one of these fads result in the permanent loss of a valuable technology. So that's one of the two sets of lessons that I want to draw from history, about what happens in a really isolated society and group.         

17. Amazon – Have you heard of FBA? It stands for “Fulfilled by Amazon” and it’s getting pretty popular. Basically, you buy products (in bulk is best) and ship them to Amazon for them to store. When your products sell, Amazon packs them up, ships them out and sends you the money (after taking their cut). There are people making a full-time living from FBA, while others just do it for some extra money.

Avoid purchases that are likely to depreciate rapidly. Spending $50,000 on a car is sometimes considered a waste because it's likely that it won't be worth half that much in five years, regardless of how much work you put into it. As soon as you drive a new car off the lot, it depreciates about 20%-25% in value and continues to do so each year you own it. [2] That makes buying a car a very important financial decision.


Can someone help. I need a job or at least a hobbie to do at home, i need to make $400 in about 2 weeks. I’m 15 so i can’t work yet. If anyone has any suggestions please e-mail me! ooh & btw i can’t mow any lawns cause everyone who lives close by dosn’t have any lawn at all. So if there is any suggestions whatsoever please feel free to e-mail me. thanks!


It turns out that the German beer industry suffers from small-scale production. There are 1,000 little local beer companies in Germany, shielded from competition with each other because each German brewery has virtually a local monopoly, and shielded from competition with imports. The United States has 67 major beer breweries, producing 23 billion liters of beer per year. Germany has 1,000 major beer breweries, producing only half as much beer per year as the United States. That's to say that the average brewery in the U.S. produces 31 times more beer than the average brewery in Germany.
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