I’ve thought about doing some of these money makin things! But seems like I just get the run around to keep doing same survey over an over or end up no where! Thinking about making my own page An advirtize for taking to store doctor appts go visit an old friend! Things like cleaning houses An cars Running errands pay bills, take car for services! Shopping , writing letters for them! I have a list of things to do to make people lives easier an earn some extra money for me!!! Thanks for ur advice I’ll just have to go over stuff see what I think will work best for me ! Thank you Tina L Taylor
It wasn't just the money, but more so, what that money symbolized. It was his ticket to something bigger and greater. He had discovered how to arbitrage in the real estate market by flipping contracts. Today, he's one of the world's most astute house flippers, but also a brilliant industry leader. He took what he learned by arbitraging in real estate, and created an entire real estate SaaS and training business, Real Estate Worldwide, around it, which currently has over 22,000 members.

Every year, hundreds of millions of documents are notarized in the United States: wills, mortgages, citizenship forms, handgun applications. While for decades, this has all been done in person, there is a budding crop of sites that allow notaries to take their services online. If you’re already a notary, you can sell your services online. Or, if you want to get started, check out the National Notary’s checklist for becoming a certified notary.

Cat is the go-to personal finance expert for educated, aspirational moms who want to recapture their life passions, earn more, reach their goals, and take on a more active financial role in their families.Cat was named the Best Contributor/Freelancer for Personal Finance in 2014, and over the past few years her writing and financial expertise have been featured in dozens of notable publications like The Wall Street Journal, Yahoo! Finance, U.S. News and World Report, and many more.
If you’re serious about making money selling things online, it’s pretty much impossible to not recommend Shopify. The platform gives you everything you need to get your online store up and running in less than a day including a custom domain, beautiful templates (so you don’t need design skills), secure payment options, and they can even take care of marketing and shipping for you. Whether you’re promoting your own products, designs, or curating other products for people in your niche, Shopify is the best option for powering your online store.
I am hoping my success story involves a combination of the blog and consulting. I’ve been really struggling with the consulting lately in an attempt at networking and obtaining more clients. Between the two blogs, keeping up with industry, and maintaining an amicable family relationship I find I am short on time. My wife has not worked for over 2 years so we are on a single income. We do have a child who takes a lot of time and money.
One should think about their skills, hobbies and basic daily habits as well. Do you like to cook? Be a personal cook or dinner parties. Baking? Make wedding cakes or cupcakes for weddings/special events. Do you enjoy cleaning? Trying going to banks/repo companies and ask if they are in need of a repo cleaner or market yourself as a all-around cleaner. Know how to mow a lawn? Get paid to do it in your neighborhood. Sell products from large companies – Jewelry in a candle, Sentsy, Health and home products – etc.
Now, I know what you’re thinking. Most of the software and apps you use on a regular basis are made by massive companies or established development studios. Well, yes. But many successful apps, particularly those in the Apple and Google stores, are created and marketed by individuals and small businesses. In fact, independent developers made $20 billion in the App Store in 2016 alone.
Whether it’s an important consumer application, a specialist app to solve a particular niche problem, or even a time-wasting game you can play on your phone, you can create a massively successful business if you build software that helps people. (Look at the rise of Slack—the team communication software that went from side project to billion-dollar company in just 2 years.)

It wasn't just the money, but more so, what that money symbolized. It was his ticket to something bigger and greater. He had discovered how to arbitrage in the real estate market by flipping contracts. Today, he's one of the world's most astute house flippers, but also a brilliant industry leader. He took what he learned by arbitraging in real estate, and created an entire real estate SaaS and training business, Real Estate Worldwide, around it, which currently has over 22,000 members.
Become a babysitter if you are good with children. There are websites that will connect you with people who need a babysitter. To get hired by people who do not know you, it will help to pass a CPR class, or to have a special talent or expertise for entertaining children. However, you might be able to make money more quickly just by babysitting for people you know, or by having friends refer you to others who need a babysitter.[13]
Now let's finally apply these lessons to comparing different industries or industrial belts within the United States. I mentioned that when I was growing up, Route 128 outside of Boston led the world in productivity for an industrial belt, but Route 128 has now fallen behind Silicon Valley. Since my book "Guns, Germs, and Steel" was published, I've spent a lot of time talking with people from Silicon Valley and some from Route 128, and they tell me that the corporate ethos in these two industrial belts is quite different. Silicon Valley consists of lots of companies that are fiercely competitive with each other, but nevertheless there's a lot of collaboration, and despite the competition there is a free flow of ideas and a free flow of people and a free flow of information between these companies that compete with each other. In contrast, I'm told that the business of Route 128 are much more secretive, and insulated from each other like Japanese milk-producing companies. 
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