I have practiced the same debt elimination and savings techniques for years, and do so quite aggressively, though more conservatively than one of my best friends. I am 60% there in savings and my only debt is my mortgage payment. My best friend in 23 years reached 130% of his goal to become a millionaire. He began with $3000 and was more aggressive in his investing than I have been. My point is, he made it…retired last year and is living off his retirement, social security and investments to the tune of $150,000 per year. He owns two homes, bought a boat and is traveling and enjoying his life to the fullest. My goal is to follow in his footsteps. All of this takes discipline and sacrifice, but believe me it can be done by anyone, so don’t think this is a bunch of bull…anyone can do it, but you MUST make saving a life time habit. Set short term savings goals and work hard to reach them. Once you reach a short term savings goal, set your next savings goal and continue to work hard to reach it. Then repeat, repeat, etc.
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Amazon makes it fairly easy to list and sell old books, games and devices on its marketplace. You can make more than just a few bucks If you have pricey textbooks from college. Be sure the books are in good condition. You'll get negative reviews if you attempt to sell books that are falling apart or games that are scratched up. Remember, be upfront about any defects, no matter how small they might be and no matter how few people might readily notice it. 

I am 17 in May and currently studying year 12. I don’t have a job though have tried a couple times. Given i have exams coming up i can’t manage a normal job but need some source of income – even if its small. I’m not all that technical so a lot of the things up there don’t work. I have strong english skills, love working with kids. I like sport, , languages animals and can cook. I have tried to get babysitting but haven’t had much luck so far.
Look, I know it’s not always realistic to pull these off; I personally wouldn’t bother trying. But if you’ve got a ton of stuff lying around — not outright junk, but stuff you don’t need, like the aforementioned DVDs and kid’s clothes — it’s worth a try. Advertise on Craigslist and put up signs in your neighborhood, then come Saturday haul a table out to your driveway (assuming you have a driveway), load it up with stuff for sale, and take whatever you can get.
It really is that easy, and I think a lot of people don’t realize that. It’s just a psychological barrier nowadays since many can’t imagine what having $1 million feels like. In reality, $1 million isn’t that much money anymore. That might sound ridiculous, but I know I’m going to need much more than $1 million to retire someday. I’m not sure what my millionaire story will be yet, but I’m certain it’s going to involve self-employment since and not a job.
Disagree with the photography idea. It may seem easy but there are those of us who have spent, in my case 10 + years learning the light, the technical aspects, the right way to pose… we have to keep pushing our prices higher because there are more people starting to eat away at the client base by undercutting…. and we’re trying to make money and feed families too. It only hurts an industry to undercut. Sorry. Good list otherwise, don’t do it as an expense to others.

Well, China's tremendous fleets came to an end through a typical episode of isolationism, such as one finds in the histories of many countries. There was a new emperor in China in 1432. In China there had been a Navy faction and an anti-Navy faction. In 1432, with the new emperor, the anti-Navy faction gained ascendancy. The new emperor decided that spending all this money on ships is a waste of money. Okay, there's nothing unusual about that in China; there was also isolationism in the United States in the 1930's, and Britain did not want anything to do with electric lighting until the 1920s. The difference, though, is that this abandoning of fleets in China was final, because China was unified under one emperor. When that one emperor gave the order to dismantle the shipyards and stop sending out the ships, that order applied to all of China, and China's tradition of building ocean-going ships was lost because of the decision by one person. China was a virtual gigantic island, like Tasmania.         
My wife picked up immediately on the problem of "weapons of mass destruction" — to use the euphemistic cliche. Are we to sit back and accept that the regulation of such things is inevitably going to fail, and that we are somehow wickedly misguided to try, putting ourselves in the anachronistic position of the Japanese samurai class, vis a vis guns, or the Chinese emperors and navies? Or can we accept that really novel dangers have to be met with really novel approaches?
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