“Great list! I especially like the tutoring stuff. I’m good at Math that’s why I tutored once for my godparent’s 8th grader. I had fun with the her and her mum cooks the most delicious brownies. I don’t think I can donate a plasma or be a human guinea pig. But maybe you should add herb and vegetable planting. This job doesn’t require too many technicalities and is so far the easiest thing to do. There’s a method called square foot gardening for those who don’t have big spaces. It’s so simple to do and gardening in small boxes requires small maintenance. There is plenty of information on the web about how to do so. Once you get growing you can even sell your fresh produce to your neighbours at a cheaper price, and earn some fast money in the process . P.S. I also would want to partake in an online survey. Some people recommended Cash Crate but I’m also curious about what happened to you?
Reduce monthly debt payments: Not all of us are in such a dire situation that we can just have our debt forgiven. However, you can cut your payments by up to 80% by refinancing. Most credit cards have interest rates above 25% and Credible’s refinance loans are as low as 4%. It won’t change the amount of your debt, but it can reduce your monthly payment significantly.
Before you get started, it’s important to acknowledge that becoming rich takes time and effort. There are very few ways to instantly have large amounts of wealth, and all of them are luck-based. Not all of us can win the lottery or inherit a fortune from a mysterious rich relative. Becoming rich in most cases involves a lot of hard work, patience, and time. There are some tried-and-true things you can do that can help you get rich, but the key is to constantly and consistently work hard, keep track of your personal finances, and keep your eyes on the prize.
My belief is that you should focus on buying value on the things you enjoy, and you should focus on making big wins to reduce your expenses on non-essentials and things which don’t bring you joy. For example, in our family eating out is a treat.  We save a lot of money by not dining very often.  But, when we do dine out we focus our efforts on nights where kids eat free.  Not only do we save money this way, but if my son decides that tonight’s dinner choice is not high on his list of priorities, we didn’t waste money on a meal.  This takes the financial tension out of any wasted food and allows my wife and I to enjoy the meal more.
We need to get this out of the way first, and besides, maybe you haven’t thought of this because you’re in complete panic mode. Check the sofa cushions, your pants pockets, old coats in the closet, and your car, where spare change may have fallen between the seats. If you haven’t ransacked your home lately and cleaned yourself out, there’s got to be some money lying around.
I propose to try to learn from human history. Human history over the last 13,000 years comprises tens of thousands of different experiments. Each human society represents a different natural experiment in organizing human groups. Human societies have been organized very differently, and the outcomes have been very different. Some societies have been much more productive and innovative than others. What can we learn from these natural experiments of history that will help us all get rich? I propose to go over two batches of natural experiments that will give you insights into how to get rich.
Of course there are also the famous differences between the productivities of the economies of different countries: the differing national average productivities of Japan and the United States and France and Germany. Actually, though, there are differences between the productivities and wealths of different business sectors within the same country. For example, the German metal-working industry has a productivity rivaling that of the United States, so the Germans are certainly capable of organizing industries well, but the German beer-brewing industry is less than half as productive as the American beer-brewing industry. Or take Japan — we Americans are paranoid about the supposed efficiency of Japanese business, and the fact is that the Japanese steel industry is 45% more productive than the American steel industry. Why is it, then, that the Japanese food-producing industry is less than 1/3 as productive and efficient as the American food-processing industry? Still another example: in Korea, the steel industry is equal in efficiency to American steel making, but all other Korean industries lag behind the United States. What is it about the different organization of the German beer brewers and the German metal workers, or the different organization of the Japanese food processors and the Japanese car manufacturers, that accounts for the different productivities of these sectors within a given country?

Love dogs, but not ready to get one of your own? Get your fix by taking care of other people’s pooches — and get paid for it. If your home isn’t dog-friendly, consider becoming a dog walker. Apps like Wag! offer on-demand dog walking, so you can pick up walks when your schedule allows. If you have space (and your landlord’s permission, if you rent), offer overnight dog boarding. Dog sitters on Rover.com, the go-to site for pet-sitting, generally command $25 to $35 a night, according to the company.
Another option that isn’t quite cash back but is along the same lines of “make money by saving money” — the Honey Chrome extension. Whenever you head to your cart to check out, Honey searches for online coupon codes or better deals from different retailers. That means no more wasted time Googling “[insert store name] coupon code” just to come up empty-handed. Honey does all the legwork for you!

Just wondering how many people you know personally, that saved and invested, especially if they made minimum wage, weren’t college educated, had a family to support, etc. and became as you say, ‘filthy rich’ by following the principles of this page? People read simple-minded articles and poor things, if they are simple-minded enough to believe the garbage.
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