Do you love getting refunds? How cool would it be to get money back on stuff you’ve already bought? Paribus is a service that lets you find out if stores you’ve shopped at online owe you a refund.  It’s free to sign up. Paribus connects to your email account and checks your receipts.  If they find out a retailer has dropped their price they file a price adjustment claim for you.  Try out Paribus.
Jared Diamond was in New York several weeks ago and we had an early dinner across the street from the Museum of Natural History where he was scheduled to speak later in the evening. Jared first visited the Museum in 1963, when he was 25 years old, preparing to go to New Guinea on his first expedition to study New Guinea birds. Subsequently he analyzed his bird collections in the museum where he is on the staff of the Museum's Department of Ornithology in addition to his position at UCLA.
Every year, hundreds of millions of documents are notarized in the United States: wills, mortgages, citizenship forms, handgun applications. While for decades, this has all been done in person, there is a budding crop of sites that allow notaries to take their services online. If you’re already a notary, you can sell your services online. Or, if you want to get started, check out the National Notary’s checklist for becoming a certified notary.
Krystal, I understand what you are saying, but I have made money selling pictures online, and I am no pro. I can get great pictures of wildlife, tropical landscapes, and many things that other photographers may not be able to get. Should I not do this, so that other photographers can? I am also trying to pay bills and run a household. It seems that raising prices could eliminate some of your future clients. I occasionally get calls because someone can’t or won’t pay $250-$500 for someone to take pictures of their family on the beach. I also give them the CD of all of their photo’s, which many photographers won’t do.
Regardless if you need to earn some fast cash or we're just talking about making money in the grand scheme of things, there's an important psychology that needs to be mentioned before getting into the strategies. If you study Freud's model of the mind, you'll discover the Psychic Apparatus. It's the three-part construct in your mind that controls all of your behavior.

As you likely know, Airbnb is a popular website where people can rent out a room or apartment from ordinary folks and bypass a hotel. So, if you’re comfortable with strangers and you live in fairly well visited place — a large city, college town, or tourist area, for example — you could make some money renting out a room in your home while you’re there, or renting out the entire place while you’re gone. You can expect to make less than whatever nearby hotels charge, but that can still top $100 a night pretty easily. In fact, Airbnb is the most lucrative of all the sharing economy gigs, according to one study.
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If you’re willing to take on some risk and have the heart of a true hustler, you can make extra money online doing commission-only sales for startups and other businesses. While you won’t be getting a regular salary, with the right sales strategies and skills as an inside sales rep, you can make decent money for each sale you bring in. And because you’ll most likely be working with startups, if you can negotiate a little equity you could profit big time if you're pitching a solid product and the startup succeeds.
Most millionaires know that it takes money to make money. Millionaires understand the power of compound interest. The study out how to make wise investments. Whether it’s taking good care of themselves so that they aren’t spending money on health care later, investing in a good education (not necessarily college, though), starting a business, or finding solid stocks to buy, millionaires study out what is likely to bring them a return. They make solid investments after considering the options.
The Ibotta app gives you cash back on the groceries you already buy. Some deals are brand specific, while others give you cash just for purchasing a certain type of item, like a loaf of bread from any brand. Choose your deals before you check out, then submit a picture of your receipt and get paid via Venmo, PayPal, or gift cards. Sign up with Ibotta to claim your $10 welcome bonus.
However, this can be debilitating, to say the least. That's likely why we see so many get-rich-quick schemes and fad weight-loss diets. We want what we want and we want it now. But we can't expect that if we're serious about making a mark in business or society. Instead of instant gratification, in order to create sheer abundance, we have to do the most amount of work for the least initial return. We have to deliver massive amounts of value, and do so repeatedly. Plain and simple.
When Europeans discovered Tasmania in the 17th century, it had technologically the simplest, most "primitive" human society of any society in the modern world. Native Tasmanians could not light a fire from scratch, they did not have bone tools, they did not have multi-piece stone tools, they did not have axes with handles, they did not have spear-throwers, they did not have boomerangs, and they did not even know how to fish. What accounts for this extreme simplicity of Tasmania society? Part of the explanation is that during the 10,000 years of isolation, the Aboriginal Australians, who numbered about 250,000, were inventing things that the isolated 4,000 Tasmanians were not inventing, such as boomerangs. Incredibly, though, archeological investigations have shown one other thing: during those 10,000 years of isolation, the Tasmanians actually lost some technologies that they had carried from the Australian mainland to Tasmania. Notably, the Tasmanians arrived in Tasmania with bone tools, and bone tools disappear from archeological record about 3,000 years ago. That's incredible, because with bone tools you can have needles, and with needles you can have warm clothing. Tasmania is at the latitude of Vladivostok and Chicago: it's snowy in the winter, and yet the Tasmanians went about either naked or just with a cape thrown over the shoulder.
Now contrast that with what happened with ocean-going fleets in Europe. Columbus was an Italian, and he wanted an ocean-going fleet to sail across the Atlantic. Everybody in Italy considered this a stupid idea and wouldn't support it. So Columbus went to the next country, France, where everybody considered it a stupid idea and wouldn't support it. So Columbus went to Portugal, where the king of Portugal considered it a stupid idea and wouldn't support it. So Columbus went across the border to a duke of Spain who considered this stupid. And Columbus then went to another duke of Spain who also considered it a waste of money. On his sixth try Columbus went to the king and queen of Spain, who said this is stupid. Finally, on the seventh try, Columbus went back to the king and queen of Spain, who said, all right, you can have three ships, but they were small ships. Columbus sailed across the Atlantic and, as we all know, discovered the New World, came back, and brought the news to Europe. Cortez and Pizarro followed him and brought back huge quantities of wealth. Within a short time, as a result of Columbus having shown the way, 11 European countries jumped into the colonial game and got into fierce competition with each other. The essence of these events is that Europe was fragmented, so Columbus had many different chances.
It’s also a good time to take advantage of the gig economy. Can you play an instrument, repair clocks, tutor someone in math, plan a party, paint signs, repair decks, or write calligraphy? Think far and wide about what you’re good at, and write an ad for yourself. Chances are, someone out there needs your expertise, no matter how small or inconsequential you consider your talents to be.
If you love to travel and find yourself randomly searching for airfare sales or browsing Lonely Planet, why not carve out a niche for yourself as a private travel agent? My friend, Mark Jackson did just that, making extra money online with his travel consulting side business. Start with word of mouth recommendations from friends who know they can count on you for the cheapest flights, and then move on and create a Facebook or LinkedIn group to invite people who want to stay on top of the latest deals. Eventually you could spin this into a full-time consultancy teaching people how to make their dream trip a reality.
If you’ve ever wanted to try real estate investing but don’t want to deal with all the stress of being a landlord, you might want to consider investing with Fundrise. Fundrise is a new platform that allows you to invest directly in a real estate portfolio that a team of professionals identifies, acquires, and manages on your behalf. With a starting investment as small as $500, you get exposure to dozens of solid, value-producing assets.

The last step resides in the concept of contribution. Even if you have no money, find a way to contribute to others. Look for opportunities where you can help those around you. Whether they're in need or not, this mindset will drive home the point that you have more than you need, even if you physically don't. Search for ways, every single day, where you can contribute either your time or your money to those who might be less fortunate, because that's the true essence of success in every form.
Jared Diamond was in New York several weeks ago and we had an early dinner across the street from the Museum of Natural History where he was scheduled to speak later in the evening. Jared first visited the Museum in 1963, when he was 25 years old, preparing to go to New Guinea on his first expedition to study New Guinea birds. Subsequently he analyzed his bird collections in the museum where he is on the staff of the Museum's Department of Ornithology in addition to his position at UCLA.
I have a question. I am 24 and I just started selling commercial insurance. My wife and I have about 70 k in student loans which we plan on paying back asap. I am going to have an additional 10k on top of my salary next year which I plan on saving until the end of the year and allocating it as I see fit. Everything I read says “compounding interest is the bomb” but then says “don’t save, pay down debt”. Now, I hate debt but I want to take full advantage of our young age and compounding interest. What would you recommend I do with extra 10k if we already put and extra $200 towards debt a month and we have an emegency fund in place? Fully Fund our IRA’s for the year or pay down a loan? I feel like there is no right or wrong answer. Your thoughts?
My wife picked up immediately on the problem of "weapons of mass destruction" — to use the euphemistic cliche. Are we to sit back and accept that the regulation of such things is inevitably going to fail, and that we are somehow wickedly misguided to try, putting ourselves in the anachronistic position of the Japanese samurai class, vis a vis guns, or the Chinese emperors and navies? Or can we accept that really novel dangers have to be met with really novel approaches?
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