That fact results from German local tastes and German government policies. German beer drinkers are fiercely loyal to their local brand of beer. And so there is no national brand of beer in Germany, analogous to Budweiser or Miller or Coors in the United States. Instead, most German beer is consumed within 30 miles of the place where it is brewed. And any of you who have been in Germany know that Germans love their local beer and loathe the beer that comes from next door. The result is that the German beer industry cannot profit from economies of scale. In the beer industry, as in other industries, production costs decrease greatly with size. The bigger the refrigerator unit for making the beer, and the longer the bottle-filling line, the cheaper is the cost of brewing beer. So these tiny German beer industries are relatively inefficient. There's no competition; there are just 1,000 local monopolies.
One man’s trash is another man’s treasure. This is ever present in the sneaker world. I am an avid sneaker collector and a huge part of the culture is buying and selling your sneakers to keep updating your stock with your current favorites. I use a website called Kixify to buy and sell some of my sneakers and it is just like Ebay or Craigslist. Whenever I need money for whatever reason, I always look to see if I have a pair of shoes I am no longer in love with and willing to sell.

I enjoyed Jared's book immensely, so it was rather a shock to find the addendum so shallow and, particularly, so depressingly pessimistic. He manages in one brief article to scotch any possibility of arms control, and to argue convincingly in favor of "the race to the bottom". For examples of the latter he could hardly have picked two more convincing cases than the American beer and food-processing industries. The purveyors of tasteless instant-grown chickens, antibiotic-saturated beef, elastic tomatoes, and paper-mache Washington State apples, not to mention massive groundwater pollution in the coastal states, are apparently to carry all before them. Fortunately, there are other countries than Japan with whom the comparison could be made, and many of them produce tasty foods efficiently. Even Diamond seems to recognise that American beer has carried the virtues of mass production beyond reasonable bounds, as a glance at the shelves of the local supermarket with its array of multiethnic and microbrewery products would confirm.
most of these site you have to be older then 18, so thus you couldn’t do any of them unless in your parents name, also you would need their credit card or pay pal account, which i don’t think any parent would let their kid have that account, best advice i can tell you is to try working in lawn care, good for you wanted to start working young, i know how hard it can be living in a small town with poor parents, mabye ask around for idea, beware of the net though, net jobs are mostly scams and they onces that aren’t you mostly have to be 18, mabye if you don’t need a permit in your town sell cookies, or your old toys in a yard sale. cleaning jobs, are good. good luck, i know what it like being you, work hard
Sell plasma. After passing an initial screening, you can usually sell your plasma for anywhere from $25 to $50 per donation. To qualify, you’ll have to stand in a long line or show up early, be willing to fill out a very personal questionnaire, and endure a painful needle prick or two. Still, selling plasma is a great way to raise money fast – if you can stand the hassle.
My wife picked up immediately on the problem of "weapons of mass destruction" — to use the euphemistic cliche. Are we to sit back and accept that the regulation of such things is inevitably going to fail, and that we are somehow wickedly misguided to try, putting ourselves in the anachronistic position of the Japanese samurai class, vis a vis guns, or the Chinese emperors and navies? Or can we accept that really novel dangers have to be met with really novel approaches?
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