Start by taking other courses you’re interested in: Not only is this important competitor and opportunity analysis, but it also gives you an idea of how a course could or should look and feel. What’s the pacing like? Is it via email, video, in-person chats? Once you understand how you want your course to look, it’s time to decide what it should include. Those same courses are a great starting place. How can you make your course better or more interesting? Do you have experience others don’t?
I have practiced the same debt elimination and savings techniques for years, and do so quite aggressively, though more conservatively than one of my best friends. I am 60% there in savings and my only debt is my mortgage payment. My best friend in 23 years reached 130% of his goal to become a millionaire. He began with $3000 and was more aggressive in his investing than I have been. My point is, he made it…retired last year and is living off his retirement, social security and investments to the tune of $150,000 per year. He owns two homes, bought a boat and is traveling and enjoying his life to the fullest. My goal is to follow in his footsteps. All of this takes discipline and sacrifice, but believe me it can be done by anyone, so don’t think this is a bunch of bull…anyone can do it, but you MUST make saving a life time habit. Set short term savings goals and work hard to reach them. Once you reach a short term savings goal, set your next savings goal and continue to work hard to reach it. Then repeat, repeat, etc.
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Now let's finally apply these lessons to comparing different industries or industrial belts within the United States. I mentioned that when I was growing up, Route 128 outside of Boston led the world in productivity for an industrial belt, but Route 128 has now fallen behind Silicon Valley. Since my book "Guns, Germs, and Steel" was published, I've spent a lot of time talking with people from Silicon Valley and some from Route 128, and they tell me that the corporate ethos in these two industrial belts is quite different. Silicon Valley consists of lots of companies that are fiercely competitive with each other, but nevertheless there's a lot of collaboration, and despite the competition there is a free flow of ideas and a free flow of people and a free flow of information between these companies that compete with each other. In contrast, I'm told that the business of Route 128 are much more secretive, and insulated from each other like Japanese milk-producing companies.


Keep in mind though, you don’t need a website to do sponsored content since you can also get paid if you have a lot of social media followers. My wife has a pretty big Instagram following, and she gets all kinds of sponsorships. Not only does she get paid in cash, but we get a lot of free stuff, too. We’ve received free rugs, free lights, and free carpet cleaners. She only promotes things she loves though, so this strategy works really well for her.


It turns out that the German beer industry suffers from small-scale production. There are 1,000 little local beer companies in Germany, shielded from competition with each other because each German brewery has virtually a local monopoly, and shielded from competition with imports. The United States has 67 major beer breweries, producing 23 billion liters of beer per year. Germany has 1,000 major beer breweries, producing only half as much beer per year as the United States. That's to say that the average brewery in the U.S. produces 31 times more beer than the average brewery in Germany.
And while you’ve probably heard of selling sperm or eggs, don’t get your hopes up: Yes, the young and the healthy can sometimes earn good money as sperm or egg donors, but such opportunities require extensive screenings and long-term commitments. Donating blood (sans plasma), meanwhile, is a great and altruistic thing to do, but you generally won’t get money for it.
I think what you’re asking is how you can make extra money to pay your real estate taxes. If that’s the case, it depends on your current financial situation, the amount of your estate taxes, your skills, and more. If you visit the “Make Money” section of our website, we have a few articles with different ideas that may be helpful for your situation: https://www.dollarsprout.com/category/make-money/
5. Fiverr – Fiverr is a great place to make a few bucks or spend a few bucks if you need some of the services people offer. Basically, everything is $5. You either pay $5 or charge $5. They call them “gigs.” You can offer your services however you choose. If you sell art and you’re fine selling pieces for $5 each, that’s a gig. If you’re a graphic designer and you want to offer your services for $10/hour, simply offer a 30 minute gig. If they need two hours of graphic design, they pay you $20, or $10/hour by buying four gigs.

And then 10,000 years ago the glaciers melted, sea level rose, and Tasmania became cut off from mainland Australia by Bass Straits, which are really rough waters. In addition, the watercraft of the Tasmanians were wash-through rafts that got waterlogged and sank after about a dozen hours. The result was that the boats of the Tasmanians could not reach Australia, and the boats of the mainland Aboriginal Australians could not reach Tasmania.

The principles that I have followed out of grad school seems to have correspond to the article. At my age as part of the mid-end of the gen X, it seems that reaching the status of millionaire doesn’t reduce the anxiety of how to provide for the family. I still worry about the same things as before, but at perhaps at a different level. I admit getting to the first million was relatively easy with luck and good planning, but I thought I would have been much better off by now. It is also very tough to maintain with a bad economy. Forget about buying the Lamborghini or the large estate, it’s time to hold what you have.


After an extremely intriguing conversation with Clothier, I began to better understand the concept of arbitrage and how anyone can use it to succeed in any industry. The difficulty here is first being able to identify opportunities for arbitrage, and later being able to fully leverage those on a larger scale. But once you find what works, expanding and scaling becomes almost instinctive and native rather than some grand hurdle.

However, this can be debilitating, to say the least. That's likely why we see so many get-rich-quick schemes and fad weight-loss diets. We want what we want and we want it now. But we can't expect that if we're serious about making a mark in business or society. Instead of instant gratification, in order to create sheer abundance, we have to do the most amount of work for the least initial return. We have to deliver massive amounts of value, and do so repeatedly. Plain and simple.

If you love to travel and find yourself randomly searching for airfare sales or browsing Lonely Planet, why not carve out a niche for yourself as a private travel agent? My friend, Mark Jackson did just that, making extra money online with his travel consulting side business. Start with word of mouth recommendations from friends who know they can count on you for the cheapest flights, and then move on and create a Facebook or LinkedIn group to invite people who want to stay on top of the latest deals. Eventually you could spin this into a full-time consultancy teaching people how to make their dream trip a reality.
Invest your savings smartly: You have full control over your spending, at least if you can control your emotions and avoid stupid purchases. It’s a lot different when it comes to investments. There are many factors beyond your control, from market trends to other people involved. That’s why the most frequent way of going from rich to poor is not lavish spending (except for lottery winners), but bad investments. Putting your money in a mutual fund is very far from smart investing. You don’t have to be a full‑time investor (since you have a daily job), but you have to be extremely smart about who you trust to manage your money. As we said, you must become financially literate.
You've seen that effect even in modern times. Twenty years ago, a few idiots in control of the world's most populous nation were able to shut down the educational system for one billion people at the time of the Great Cultural Revolution, whereas it's impossible for a few idiots to shut down the educational system of all of Europe. This suggests, then, that Europe's fragmentation was a great advantage to Europe as far as technological and scientific innovation is concerned. Does this mean that a high degree of fragmentation is even better? Probably not. India was geographically even more fragmented than Europe, but India was not technologically as innovative as Europe. And this suggests that there is an optimal intermediate degree of fragmentation, that a too-unified society is a disadvantage, and a too-fragmented society is also a disadvantage. Instead, innovation proceeds most rapidly in a society with some intermediate degree of fragmentation.
And while it will take time to build up a big-enough audience to attract advertisers and other ways to make extra income from your podcast, the opportunity is there. John Lee Dumas interviews entrepreneurs seven days a week for his podcast Entrepreneur on Fire and now makes more than $200,000 a month from it. In fact, John publishes all his income online and showed that he’s made almost $13 million since launching in 2012.
Now let's finally apply these lessons to comparing different industries or industrial belts within the United States. I mentioned that when I was growing up, Route 128 outside of Boston led the world in productivity for an industrial belt, but Route 128 has now fallen behind Silicon Valley. Since my book "Guns, Germs, and Steel" was published, I've spent a lot of time talking with people from Silicon Valley and some from Route 128, and they tell me that the corporate ethos in these two industrial belts is quite different. Silicon Valley consists of lots of companies that are fiercely competitive with each other, but nevertheless there's a lot of collaboration, and despite the competition there is a free flow of ideas and a free flow of people and a free flow of information between these companies that compete with each other. In contrast, I'm told that the business of Route 128 are much more secretive, and insulated from each other like Japanese milk-producing companies.
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