Don't spend money on stupid stuff. It's hard enough making a living. But it's hard and painful when the things you spend your hard-earned cash on are financial black holes. Reevaluate the things you spend money on. Try to figure out whether they are truly "worth it." Here are some things you probably don't want to spend that much money on if you plan on becoming rich:
Change jobs and employer. Once you've gotten some experience under your belt, consider finding a new job. By changing your environment, you can increase your pay and experience different corporate cultures. Don't be afraid to do this several times. If you're a valued employee, it's also likely your current company may offer you a raise or other benefits if they know you're looking at leaving.
Rover is a dog walking and pet sitting website that is always looking for qualified dog walkers in cities all over the United States. So when you take your pup on a walk, you can also take a second (or third) dog with you and get paid to walk. 30-minute walks fall in the $10-30 range. With a neighborhood route, that can add up quickly! You’re just a short application away from getting started.
Tenants sounds good, but can be a toxic problem as I recall before of one studying Religion and Ministry somewhere and claimed to be clean and laid back, but came to light by another tenant he stayed with to have a bad temper, bad attitude and never clean up his own dishes and have his stuff scattered in living room without first discussing with his roommate and always asked other roomie for rides and money as a moocher and would get pushy if his roomie refused as unable to at times.

Do you constantly come up with witty one-liners? Do you dream of the days of Mad Men-style advertising? If you’ve got some branding chops or just come up with imaginative copy, there are lots of opportunities to make money online through company naming and slogan contests. If you think you have a knack for names check out the Squadhelp platform where you can earn a little extra money online by naming brands, services, products, company slogans and even help out on the logo design front if you've got the chops.
Once you’ve gathered a list, put together a template outreach email (as you’ll be doing this over and over) that’s short and clear with expectations. Tell your potential interviewee who you are, what your podcast is about, and what you’re asking of them. Do a few test interviews with friends and family to make sure everything is being recorded at the quality you want and then book your first episode.
It sounds a bit like a cliche, doesn't it? Just add value, and everything will be better. But how many people do you really think go out there into the world with the desire to add massive amounts of value? Clearly, many people are out there to do the least amount of work for the greatest return. That mindset is born from the id. It's instinctive, and hidden within the far reaches of our subconscious mind. Overcoming that is a hurdle, but a very necessary one to make.
My wife picked up immediately on the problem of "weapons of mass destruction" — to use the euphemistic cliche. Are we to sit back and accept that the regulation of such things is inevitably going to fail, and that we are somehow wickedly misguided to try, putting ourselves in the anachronistic position of the Japanese samurai class, vis a vis guns, or the Chinese emperors and navies? Or can we accept that really novel dangers have to be met with really novel approaches? 
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