the problem with “CashCrate” is that the amount of money that u get out of it is VERY slim.. and even to get that VERY slim portion of money you have to complete a lot of surveys and to cash-in on the money you earned u must make over $20, trust me. i tried it, it took me over 6-12 months to get the cash.. i used the site like if my life depended on it. it was very hard.
Blaz Kos writes about data-driven personal development at AgileLeanLife.com. Blaz Kos helps people shape superior life strategies by: (1) employing the best business practices in personal life management, (2) teaching established psychological techniques to better manage mind and emotions, and (3) setting goals based on understanding market paradigms, the quantified self, and following cold hardcore metrics that prevent any fake feeling of progress. He is obsessively passionate about hi-tech, mass media, personal development and making the world a better place.

I’m 27 years old, I am married to a doctor in residency, just bought our first condo in boston have a roth account a 401k some precios metals. I want to be doing so much more but kind of stuck not knowing what to do next. We are working on paying off debt from my wife’s med school and the condo. Does anyone have any advice? I have a finnacial advisor also and he just tells me to keep investing! I need more direction then that! I’m 27 there’s a lot to learn still…. I’m currently working on making more money at my job just have to wait for the big promotion. Please help?? Thanks guys
If you want to clear some space out in your house and have a big stack of books you’ve been holding onto for too long, you can make money selling your books and textbooks online. Stores like Half Priced Books and others will give you cents on the dollar for each of your current books while you can check what your book is worth by simply entering the ISBN number on Book Scouter.
Spending intentionally doesn’t require pinching every penny, but you should know where those pennies are going and that the destination is something you value, whether that’s travel or good food. It’s easy to fall into a habit of doing the opposite, basically a financial version of mindless eating — buying a new pair of shoes because you walked by the shoe store, for example.
Disagree with the photography idea. It may seem easy but there are those of us who have spent, in my case 10 + years learning the light, the technical aspects, the right way to pose… we have to keep pushing our prices higher because there are more people starting to eat away at the client base by undercutting…. and we’re trying to make money and feed families too. It only hurts an industry to undercut. Sorry. Good list otherwise, don’t do it as an expense to others.

If you’re trained in a marketable skill — like graphic or web design, SEO writing, or video animation — to the point where you can bang out the work in your sleep, you can make a pretty quick buck with it on Fiverr. Whether it’s the best long-term strategy for your freelance career is debatable – and it’s one of the least lucrative gig economy side hustles out there – but that’s not the point; the point is that there’s the potential for earning money quickly.
×