I couldn’t disagree more. The concept of systematic saving and hoping for a solid average return in the markets isn’t something that I believe in anymore. I’m 32, and have been investing in the markets since I was 18, under the assumption that if I set up automatic contributions throughout my life I would ultimately be “rich”. I started by maxing out my SEP-IRA and then by maxing my Roth. I invest monthly in a range of products, again, all with the goal of cost averaging the market to my benefit over time. Fast forward 14 years from when I began, and I have accumulated less than $60k. My invested dollar amount exceeds my current total, as it did even at the recent market highs in 2007. In other words, investing for the long haul doesn’t work like it used to, particularly for my generation. The first decade of wage earning is the most important in terms of compounding interest, and we have just experienced a completely lost decade. The hopes for recovery to make up for that lost decade (14 yrs in my case) do not appear reasonable. David
Rose and others looking for employment this summer: Retry the babysitting idea. Summer is a good time to babysit. Maybe volunteer a few times first and then use those families as references. Tell everyone you know that you are available to babysit. Use email, Facebook, fliers, word of mouth. Also try offering a set time every week, like Tuesday evenings form 5-9 pm in your home. Parents know they can drop off their children without calling ahead. They really appreciate that. It takes time and persistence to get the word out, butit can be done!
I advocate for the Tim Ferris, multiple income stream strategy. It’s important to have a diversified portfolio and automatic income streams that supplement your basic income earned through work. Selecting the best investment and income streams requires a person do the research, but very basic strategies can be employed that grow the money nest. I think the article is right to say it’s better to earn rather than save more than you spend, because saving money can depend on very specific contexts, while earning money tends to be more predictive. Good article.
Rose and others looking for employment this summer: Retry the babysitting idea. Summer is a good time to babysit. Maybe volunteer a few times first and then use those families as references. Tell everyone you know that you are available to babysit. Use email, Facebook, fliers, word of mouth. Also try offering a set time every week, like Tuesday evenings form 5-9 pm in your home. Parents know they can drop off their children without calling ahead. They really appreciate that. It takes time and persistence to get the word out, butit can be done! 

After listening to your show, I found a lead to my first side hustle. For my wife’s program and mine, we are required to have CPR. We took our class to meet these requirements, and I talked with our instructor who passed my name to the owner letting him know I was curious about becoming an instructor. I was contacted about certifying myself to teach classes! – John S.
It’s also a good time to take advantage of the gig economy. Can you play an instrument, repair clocks, tutor someone in math, plan a party, paint signs, repair decks, or write calligraphy? Think far and wide about what you’re good at, and write an ad for yourself. Chances are, someone out there needs your expertise, no matter how small or inconsequential you consider your talents to be.

Real estate is sometimes a good investment, but it is expensive. Investing in the stock market does not have to be expensive, but it can be risky and unstable. A 401K is a wise investment that you should invest in, but it can depend on how well the business you work for is doing. There are plenty of factors to consider when investing, so make sure you think about it rationally. Talk to experts or friends who are experienced in investing before making a decision.


Have an extra room in the house? Try renting it out on Airbnb.com. According to Smart Asset, you can pay up to 81% of your rent by listing one room in a two-bedroom home. If you're really looking to ring in the cash, renting out a private home or apartment is the way to go. According to Smart Asset's findings, rates for full apartments are significantly higher than those for just rooms, with annual profits ranging from $15,000 to $31,000 for a two-bedroom apartment.
The folly of youth is believing that there's always enough time for everything. Youngsters often believe that retirement, or wealth building, is something that comes later in life, and are more preoccupied with the concerns of the now. Unfortunately, this often leads to a cycle of "Oh, I should do that next month," month after month, until before you know it, you're 10 years older and you've missed out on a decade's worth of compounding interest. The first step is to stop procrastinating; saving and investing is scary, but the longer you wait to do it, the fewer advantages you have.
If this is the first time you are hearing about this, though, then we actually do not recommend trying it. The average skill level of players on the Internet has improved so much over the past few years that it’s virtually guaranteed that a new player will lose money over the medium to long-term. But hey, Ben made upwards of 6 figures playing online in poker in college, so we had to list it. 🙂

It sounds a bit like a cliche, doesn't it? Just add value, and everything will be better. But how many people do you really think go out there into the world with the desire to add massive amounts of value? Clearly, many people are out there to do the least amount of work for the greatest return. That mindset is born from the id. It's instinctive, and hidden within the far reaches of our subconscious mind. Overcoming that is a hurdle, but a very necessary one to make.
Two thoughts come to mind. First, at 27 you have a whole life in front of you, so whatever you do will be right if it is directed correctly. Second, pick a goal and work towards it (e.g., pay off medical debt; or pay off condo mortgage). Always remember, as you succeed in any one of these, then you can broaden out into other investments opportunities (e.g., stocks, mutual funds, real estates, etc.). The choice and timing are yours to call. My basic point; however, is while you are young “focus” on a GOAL and go after the goal aggressively.

Have an extra room in the house? Try renting it out on Airbnb.com. According to Smart Asset, you can pay up to 81% of your rent by listing one room in a two-bedroom home. If you're really looking to ring in the cash, renting out a private home or apartment is the way to go. According to Smart Asset's findings, rates for full apartments are significantly higher than those for just rooms, with annual profits ranging from $15,000 to $31,000 for a two-bedroom apartment.
But rich can also be psychological richness. It is an achievement of being able to live without the worry of money. You don’t necessarily need to own a castle to be considered rich. Everyone can be rich as long as we are able to do what we desire freely and to have the fulfilment in life. The key of it is to live with or even less than what you have. To be “normal” even when you are financially capable to do a lot more.
Whether it’s an important consumer application, a specialist app to solve a particular niche problem, or even a time-wasting game you can play on your phone, you can create a massively successful business if you build software that helps people. (Look at the rise of Slack—the team communication software that went from side project to billion-dollar company in just 2 years.)
Skillshare: Want to teach people things but don’t want to make them publically for free? Skillshare is a platform that allows people to create online courses to help others and if people use your course, Skillshare will pay you. Want to learn from other creators? There isn’t a better place on the internet. Skillshare comes built-in with an audience interested in learning online.
Using the money you already have to make more money is usually a pretty smart move. A service like Lending Club is a great way to act as a lender and earn interest on your money. Essentially, you act as the bank, which is pretty neat. Lending Club is the world’s largest online credit marketplace connecting borrowers and investors. Definitely something worth looking into!
I am 17 in May and currently studying year 12. I don’t have a job though have tried a couple times. Given i have exams coming up i can’t manage a normal job but need some source of income – even if its small. I’m not all that technical so a lot of the things up there don’t work. I have strong english skills, love working with kids. I like sport, , languages animals and can cook. I have tried to get babysitting but haven’t had much luck so far.
Tim, I know several millionaires, and most of them have done it the old fashioned way, which is working and saving over many years. Some have started their own businesses, some have made wealth through other means such as investments and real estate, and some have done it other ways. Virtually all of the millionaires I know have families (some were married without children, but most had children). I’ve never counted how many millionaires I know, but of the people I know for certain, I would venture to say that I know at least 10-15 of them would qualify under these standards. As for the college education part of it, I’ve never taken a poll to find out how many had degrees and which degree they had, if they had one.

Create a killer course experience: With your course validated and in the works, you need to figure out how people will take it. Most course creators choose to host their courses from their own websites. This way, they get all the value of bringing customers back to their site on a regular basis. I host my own courses from a subdomain on my own site so I can easily add more. The course experience is incredibly important as well. And after trying most of the solutions, I highly recommend Teachable—an online platform designed specifically for courses. 
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