Spend your tax refund wisely. In 2007, the average American tax refund was $2,733. That's a lot of money! Can you use that money to pay off debts or create an emergency fund instead of blowing it on something that will lose half its value the second you buy it? If you invest nearly $3,000 wisely, it could be worth ten times that much in as many years.
Look, I know it’s not always realistic to pull these off; I personally wouldn’t bother trying. But if you’ve got a ton of stuff lying around — not outright junk, but stuff you don’t need, like the aforementioned DVDs and kid’s clothes — it’s worth a try. Advertise on Craigslist and put up signs in your neighborhood, then come Saturday haul a table out to your driveway (assuming you have a driveway), load it up with stuff for sale, and take whatever you can get.
all your advice works. i know because i have followed those steps since my early to mid-20s when, as a self-employed freelance journalist, i opened what was then called a keough account. those were pre-cursors of today’s ira’s. i always socked the limit into those, and soon opened an ira, as well as a 401k and a roth when they became available. i also opened fidelity and later, vanguard, mutual fund accounts. i always saved more than i spent, probably at least half my pay, which was never higher than about $65k during all the years i worked in journalism. true, my friends always liked to joke that i was “cheap,” but who’s laughing now? i crossed the $1m line in late 04, quit full-time work at age 51 and do exactly as i please with myself today, which is mainly being a semi-pro musician, the career the i almost established when i was in college. mercifully, i don’t have to live off it today. my main advice is to avoid credit-card debt. i am always astonished by how much people carry. ive never carried any. my debts are always limited to mortgage and, at times, car loans. i could own fancier cars and houses, but i have never felt the need, unlike my cash rich, but investment-poor friends. i live off corporate junk bonds today, plus music and random freelancing. my goal is to get to about $1.5m, get 80 percennt out of today’s way too unstable stock market, and live off mostly fixed income investments. way down the road, ill add social security, and a pension from the 25-years-plus i worked in newspapers. it can be done. the millionaire-next-door exists all around us.

Take the phrase “one person’s trash is another person’s treasure” to heart by purging your closet of clothes that you don’t wear anymore. You’ll have the best luck selling items that are on trend, so consider purging items that are still in style, but you don’t wear anymore. Head to a local thrift shop or consignment shop to see how much your clothes are worth!

With drop shipping, you’re effectively partnering with a manufacturer or wholesaler to sell their products. This way, you don’t pay upfront costs to buy inventory, aren’t sitting on unsold items taking up expensive warehouse space, and don’t have to deal with shipping the products yourself. You simply create your site, fill it with drop shippable products, and drive in customers, with almost everything else done for you.
You could start with the ideas in this post. But we also have lots of other posts on this site that might help. Check out the ones on how to make money from home or side hustles. You could also check into getting assistance from the social services office in your area. In some areas they are called the Department for Children and Families, in others just Social & Rehabilitation Services. They might be able to help with basic needs, such as food, as well as helping you get qualified for Medicaid for health needs. I hope that helps you out.
Use your skills to do day labor. Post an ad online or on a bulletin board offering to do odd jobs or sign up with an employment agency that specializes in temporary work. An alternative way to find day labor is to go where other day laborers meet, if you know of any, and wait for employers (building contractors, landscapers, homeowners and small business owners). Common odd jobs people need day laborers for include:[10]
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Another important personality trait to being successful and rich is patience. Nothing big is accomplished overnight, and you cannot and will not get rich in a matter of days. All the efforts you put towards accumulating wealth could take months or even years to pay off. It’s easy to get frustrated early on, especially when it seems like there’s a new wealthy person in the news every other day. However, realizing that your pace of success does not have to compete with theirs is crucial.

Seek a payday loan or title loan as a last resort. Companies that offer payday and title loan services typically offer extremely high interest rates (sometimes with percentages in the hundreds). If you cannot pay the loan and any interest back within the stated timeline, you risk even higher interest costs or, in the case of a title loan, the loss of your car. Avoid these types of loans in all but the direst circumstances, unless you are certain you will be able to pay the loan back.


If you don’t live in a bottle deposit state, you can still cash in on recyclables by selling scrap metal. You may not have enough soda or beer cans lying around to make this worthwhile — and steel prices are so low right now, it’s not really worth the bother to go collecting them. But if you do have a lot of aluminum cans on hand, or if you have any scrap metal with copper in it, find a local recycling center and see what you’ll get (prices vary wildly by market). Still, unless you have a lot of copper pipes lying around the garage, or bags and bags and bags of old soda cans, realistically, we’re probably talking about getting $5 to $20 back.
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