Sprinkled with heavy doses of his poetry to savor a point or illustrate required thinking and action, this book isn't an easy or particularly fun read, I found myself wondering if I really wanted to finish it at several points only because of the colloquialisms he spouts while telling his tale which may require stopping to figure out what he actually meant. But, other than that, he does a great job laying out the steps to becoming rich which may surprise the get rich self-help reader who follows this topic, voraciously reading every popular book on the subject.
Even though risk-taking is a generally rewarding strategy in your 20s and 30s, it's also a good idea to diversify your efforts. Don't build up just one skill set, or one set of professional connections. Don't rely on one type of investment, and don't gamble all your savings on one venture. Instead, try to set up multiple income streams, generate several backup plans for your goals and businesses, and hedge your bets by looking for new opportunities everywhere. This will protect you from catastrophic losses, and increase your chances of striking it big in one of your ventures.
Hi Michelle, such a great post! My bread and butter is freelance writing, and I’ve used that to create a full-time income online for around seven years now. I also have an eBay reselling business, and I absolutely LOVE doing that… Working from home can be quite isolating at times, so I love scheduling thrift store trips etc into my working week. It keeps me sane, and reselling is so fun 🙂
In my (unpopular) opinion, getting a raise is harder than getting a promotion. Think about it from your boss’s perspective, would you rather a) pay more money for the same service, or b) pay more money for additional responsibilities. Alas, if you feel you’re overdue a raise, check out Dr. Randall Hansen’s article on Getting the Raise You Deserve. There are some really useful strategies there.
I couldn’t disagree more. The concept of systematic saving and hoping for a solid average return in the markets isn’t something that I believe in anymore. I’m 32, and have been investing in the markets since I was 18, under the assumption that if I set up automatic contributions throughout my life I would ultimately be “rich”. I started by maxing out my SEP-IRA and then by maxing my Roth. I invest monthly in a range of products, again, all with the goal of cost averaging the market to my benefit over time. Fast forward 14 years from when I began, and I have accumulated less than $60k. My invested dollar amount exceeds my current total, as it did even at the recent market highs in 2007. In other words, investing for the long haul doesn’t work like it used to, particularly for my generation. The first decade of wage earning is the most important in terms of compounding interest, and we have just experienced a completely lost decade. The hopes for recovery to make up for that lost decade (14 yrs in my case) do not appear reasonable. David
We're in an explosive era of growth. Thanks to the birth of the internet and our newfound global connectivity, generating a real income online, no matter where you live or what you do, has become a modern-day convenience. Gone are the doldrums of 9-to-5 employment and the necessity to head into a life-sucking corporate job. Today, the so-called "dream" revolves around the lifestyle entrepreneur, able to make money, travel the world and live life to the fullest from anywhere on the planet.
People are always looking to have their cars washed and detailed. You could be a mobile car washer and detailer without having a permanent location. Reach out to people you know or make some flyers and put it in your neighbors' mailboxes. If you want to get serious about it, prop up a one-page website or give out business cards. You can make money quickly doing this.
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