Sell stuff online. If you have high-quality items to sell, there are a slew of online marketplaces you can use. Just make sure you understand the fees associated with your sale before you take the plunge. Where neighborhood Facebook pages and Craigslist ads are free, many online marketplaces or consignment shops charge for ads or require you to fork over a percentage when you make a sale.
Avoid purchases that are likely to depreciate rapidly. Spending $50,000 on a car is sometimes considered a waste because it's likely that it won't be worth half that much in five years, regardless of how much work you put into it. As soon as you drive a new car off the lot, it depreciates about 20%-25% in value and continues to do so each year you own it. [2] That makes buying a car a very important financial decision.
The Ego -- Consider the ego as the referee between both the id and the superego. The ego's job is to satisfy the id while also working within the confines of the superego. This isn't the ego in the traditional sense, but rather that component of the mind that acts as the primary driver of the psychic apparatus. Since every person is unique with unique experiences, the ego works differently in each of us.

Have a yard sale to sell things you no longer need. Choose a day or a couple of days to have your yard sale and advertise it in your local paper and online, such as on social media and classified websites. Then, on the day of the sale, arrange the items on tables, blankets, shelves, or in other ways in front of your home. You can arrange the items into groups by price, or price them individually.[3]
When was the last time you went to a new restaurant without looking it up online beforehand? Or bought a product that didn’t have at least a few 5-star reviews? It seems like more and more our world is run on reviews. And you can make money online by writing them. Get started by creating accounts on sites like Vindale research, Software Judge, FameBit, CrowdTap, Influence Central, and Modern Mom. However, before you run off and start writing, be sure to check the small print on each of these sites. Writing reviews isn’t a huge source of guaranteed income and you want to make sure that it’s worth your time before you get going.

Something many self-made wealthy people have in common is that they are valuable in specific ways. Even when millionaires and billionaires are taken out of the equation, many rich people — doctors, engineers, filmmakers — have gotten rich after adding value to themselves and then adding value to the world. For example, a rich neurosurgeon may be specially talented and skilled. This surgeon added value to the world after improving their own skills and quality of life.
Most of them have told me that if I’m interested in consulting, I have to talk to someone at Deloitte. Do you think I could pick your brain on your job and what motivated you to choose Deloitte? I’d especially love to know how you made your choices after graduating from Michigan State. [THE PHRASE “PICK YOUR BRAIN” IS ONE OF THE BEST WAYS TO ASK FOR ADVICE AND FLATTER, AND “MICHIGAN STATE” REINFORCES SHARED BOND.]
While droves of individuals salivate over the ability to live, work and play anywhere in the world that they chose to, most are primarily fixated on the ability to just earn a bit of money online. One stream of revenue would likely make the world of difference to many folks. But doing that seems to be an ever-increasing technical challenge. So it isn't about getting rich for a large degree of people, but rather, finding a way to earn just a little bit more money without all the added time it might take.
Borrowing could be a key element in this method. Say you borrow $200,000 and put in $50,000 of your own to buy a property for $250,000. Then you develop the property and sell it for $400,000. The property has increased in value by 60% but your $50,000 has now grown fourfold to $200,000. You have to select the right properties in the right areas and develop them wisely.

Jean Paul Getty was an American industrialist and founder of the Getty Oil Company. In 1957 Fortune magazine named him the richest living American, and the 1966 Guinness Book of Records named him the world’s richest private citizen, worth nearly 9 billion dollars in today’s money. He was the author of several books, including the bestselling How to Be Rich, and his autobiography, As I See It. He died in 1976.


Take the phrase “one person’s trash is another person’s treasure” to heart by purging your closet of clothes that you don’t wear anymore. You’ll have the best luck selling items that are on trend, so consider purging items that are still in style, but you don’t wear anymore. Head to a local thrift shop or consignment shop to see how much your clothes are worth!
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Yes, I went to bartending school after I graduated from college. When I didn’t get any job interviews, and my meager savings were drying up I needed a quick solution to make money for the rent. Five days later and $495 lighter, I graduated bartending school. I never poured a drink – I found a programming job the same week I was supposed to start bartending at a golf club.
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