In 2014, Caitlin Pyle made over $43,000 by working as a freelance proofreader…part time. When she wasn’t working, she even had time to go on several fun vacations. After she had a ton of success doing that, she decided she wanted to teach others how to do the same thing, so she started up Proofread Anywhere. Sign up for one of her free workshops to learn more about making money as a proofreader.
23. Affiliates – There are many affiliate networks, such as FlexOffers and CJ Affiliate that allow you to promote other people’s products and services. You simply put a link or a banner on your page and then you get a percentage if someone clicks through and buys the product/service. You’ll want to select products that are specifically within your blog’s category.This is an effective way to earn money once you have the traffic coming to your blog.

Last but not least, you can also earn money online by building an online community, although the monetization strategies you can pursue will vary a lot depending on your goals. You can build a community with a blog, for example. You can also build an online forum and charge people for membership. You could even build up a Facebook group and use your influence there to sell and promote products.

GlobalTestMarket — They pay up to $5 per survey just for sharing your opinions. Joining is easy — just enter your email address, fill out some information about your household, and you’re in. GlobalTestMarket has paid out over $34 million to members worldwide since 2014, so needless to say they’re the real deal. When you sign up with GlobalTestMarket, you’ll be automatically entered into their sweepstakes to for a chance to win $2,000.
That being said, life in your 20s and 30s is not without its challenges; you might have student debt, a tenuous career, and dozens of unknowns that keep you from doing everything you'd like to build your wealth faster. There's no straightforward way to guarantee yourself a rich future, but these seven strategies can help you do it while you're still young.
Ryan and all, thanks for sharing these encouraging thoughts and ideas here. After going through all comments I feel “to become a multi-millionaire” is no longer a secret..its all about handling money in a disciplined way. I am really excited to explore this finance world and in that context I need one help from you all experts. Could you kindly recommend me some books (for a beginner) on asset allocation/portfolio management. Thanks for doing all great work here. This site is now bookmarked ?
Hold a yard sale. If you have a yard or garage and plenty of items to sell, you can have a yard sale as early as tomorrow. By advertising your sale on local Facebook pages and Craigslist, you can also skip the paid newspaper ad and keep all of the profits for yourself. If you don’t have time to price everything, try asking patrons to “make an offer” or grouping similar items on tables with an advertised price (e.g. everything on this table is $5).

Thank you for all the advice you offer. Im only 23 years old and stumbled upon your writing on debt management a few months ago and have already reduced my debt by 30%. People may knit pick at what you say but the underlining is always the same…less debt+saving and investing leads financial freedom. I look forward to continuing to read what you have to say and making these millions with you brother.

This is an awesome book. It isn't a step by step book to riches but more of a common sense guide. Sometimes a little preachy but I loved how it covers a great deal of in depth details. My husband read the book years ago and kept recommending it to me. I'm an entrepreneur but my business seems to move slowly. This book helps you figure out for yourself where your weaknesses are. Maybe a little tough to read if you feel like you already know everything, but essential read if you expect to be successful.
The folly of youth is believing that there's always enough time for everything. Youngsters often believe that retirement, or wealth building, is something that comes later in life, and are more preoccupied with the concerns of the now. Unfortunately, this often leads to a cycle of "Oh, I should do that next month," month after month, until before you know it, you're 10 years older and you've missed out on a decade's worth of compounding interest. The first step is to stop procrastinating; saving and investing is scary, but the longer you wait to do it, the fewer advantages you have.
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