Cut off 10 in (25 cm) or more of your hair and sell it online. If your hair is healthy, untreated, and long enough to cut off at least 10 in (25 cm), you can sell it. Prices paid for healthy human hair increase with the length and thickness of the hair, so you may potentially earn good money for your hair. There are now online marketplaces to help you sell your hair, in addition to salons or other centers in your area that may be interested in buying hair.[21]
Getty illustrated the purpose and value of having money. He reviews three different mentalities toward work, toward achieving and investing one's time. Basically, it's how you spend your time. Do you spend it working for other people, going home at the end of the day being like everyone else? Do you rise to the top, investing in what you do, in hopes that if your company succeeds, you do? Do you work for yourself? Create? Invest in yourself, for yourself? The book begged the question, "Who are you in terms of your values with wealth?" Very philosophical. Do you help others with it? Stockpile it and not help a soul? Do you blow it all? Do you save? It only means what it means to you. I like this book. I liked Getty.
Ryan and all, thanks for sharing these encouraging thoughts and ideas here. After going through all comments I feel “to become a multi-millionaire” is no longer a secret..its all about handling money in a disciplined way. I am really excited to explore this finance world and in that context I need one help from you all experts. Could you kindly recommend me some books (for a beginner) on asset allocation/portfolio management. Thanks for doing all great work here. This site is now bookmarked ?
While it is possible to make a lot of money while working for someone else, the truth is that you should mind your own business. Start and grow your own business, no matter what it might be. Identify what you're really good at, and develop the skills into a business that you can expand over time. Don't look for instant payouts or overnight riches. The reality is that it's going to take time, so you might as well start now.
The folly of youth is believing that there's always enough time for everything. Youngsters often believe that retirement, or wealth building, is something that comes later in life, and are more preoccupied with the concerns of the now. Unfortunately, this often leads to a cycle of "Oh, I should do that next month," month after month, until before you know it, you're 10 years older and you've missed out on a decade's worth of compounding interest. The first step is to stop procrastinating; saving and investing is scary, but the longer you wait to do it, the fewer advantages you have.
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