You could try advertising more, for example, by putting up signs around the neighborhood, posting about it on social media, or having people you know spread the word. You could also try doing it in a different neighborhood that might have friendlier people, or do it in a time and place where there's likely to be a lot of people walking around the area (e.g., near a church before the end of a mass).
For example, a $200,000 mortgage on a 30-year loan will cost you another $186,500 in interest payments, so you are actually paying a total of $386,500 over the course of 30 years. On the other hand, if you are willing to pay a few extra hundred dollars a month (for example, $350) by refinancing to a 15-year loan (usually at a lower interest rate), you could pay your mortgage off in only 15 years, and the best part is you would save yourself a whopping $123,700 in interest. That's money in your pocket. Talk to a loan officer about your options.
Amazon makes it fairly easy to list and sell old books, games and devices on its marketplace. You can make more than just a few bucks If you have pricey textbooks from college. Be sure the books are in good condition. You'll get negative reviews if you attempt to sell books that are falling apart or games that are scratched up. Remember, be upfront about any defects, no matter how small they might be and no matter how few people might readily notice it. 
If you’re serious about becoming rich, you’re going to need to step out of your comfort zone and recognize that the path to success is through uncertainty. Traditional paths, like having a steady job and a fixed check, are safer, but wealth often comes through taking calculated risks. Don’t let fear hold you back. If you dream of something more, learn to embrace different possibilities.
Every year, hundreds of millions of documents are notarized in the United States: wills, mortgages, citizenship forms, handgun applications. While for decades, this has all been done in person, there is a budding crop of sites that allow notaries to take their services online. If you’re already a notary, you can sell your services online. Or, if you want to get started, check out the National Notary’s checklist for becoming a certified notary.
The path to becoming a millionaire becomes easier once you get the process started. It all starts at the beginning with small lifestyle changes. For example, making small lifestyle changes to reduce your fixed monthly expenses can go a long way toward helping you spend less than you earn. This, in turn, makes it easier to save a little money each month. Once you have a little cash saved, small emergencies are no longer emergencies and you are no longer treading water. This makes it easier to invest.
Honestly, however, this may not be very realistic for a lot of people. I wouldn’t count on this if you’re trying to make your rent, and you’re putting all of your eggs in one basket. First, someone has to look at your location and listing photos and say, “Sure, I’d like to stay there,” and that may or may not happen within a month. It may never happen.

Market your course: The beauty of using a course to make money online is that you can continue to sell it for as long as you’d like. Look for niche communities on Facebook, LinkedIn, or Reddit that might benefit from your content. Guest post on relevant blogs and sites. Look for anywhere you might be able to get in front of the right people. With just a few hours a month you can continue to generate sales.
If you love kids, sign up for Care.com or SitterCity to spend a few hours a week babysitting. These websites verify both babysitters and those seeking sitters with background checks, so you can ensure you're conversing with a reliable source. Babysitting rates vary based on years of experience, number of children, and hours per week. According to ZipRecruiter, the average hourly rate for a babysitter is $28. Use Care.com's calculator to plug in your experience and find out how much your should be making an hour as a babysitter.
In 2014, Caitlin Pyle made over $43,000 by working as a freelance proofreader…part time. When she wasn’t working, she even had time to go on several fun vacations. After she had a ton of success doing that, she decided she wanted to teach others how to do the same thing, so she started up Proofread Anywhere. Sign up for one of her free workshops to learn more about making money as a proofreader.
Monevator: I don’t think a net worth goal is the way to go either, but a lot of people put stock in a number (it’s an easy concept for a lot of people who are new to personal finance). Personally I’m going for exactly what you mentioned – the crossover point where my investments are earning me more money in passive income than my day job. That is when I will feel financially free.
The Ego -- Consider the ego as the referee between both the id and the superego. The ego's job is to satisfy the id while also working within the confines of the superego. This isn't the ego in the traditional sense, but rather that component of the mind that acts as the primary driver of the psychic apparatus. Since every person is unique with unique experiences, the ego works differently in each of us.
I have read many posts and blogs on earning a million dollars or passive income. For some time, I wonder whether striving to be a millionaire for years or decades (as you wrote) it is the thing that people should be guided in life. Maybe it’s better to focus in life on what gives us pleasure and transform it into a business. If in life we make money on our passion, instead of attending to disliked job, we will make money, but it will not be our top priority.

For that reason, the story of an iconic online marketing legend and founder of, Real Estate World Wide (REWW), Kent Clothier, is one of the most inspirational modern-day fables about, not just attaining wealth at the highest levels, but also in reinvention, revitalization and the ability to produce multiple streams of revenue even when you're emotionally and spiritually bankrupt. This is an individual who played an integral role in building up a nearly $2-billion-dollar-per-year grocery-arbitrage business, but then walked away from it at 30-years old with no ownership retention.
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