Have a yard sale to sell things you no longer need. Choose a day or a couple of days to have your yard sale and advertise it in your local paper and online, such as on social media and classified websites. Then, on the day of the sale, arrange the items on tables, blankets, shelves, or in other ways in front of your home. You can arrange the items into groups by price, or price them individually.[3]
all your advice works. i know because i have followed those steps since my early to mid-20s when, as a self-employed freelance journalist, i opened what was then called a keough account. those were pre-cursors of today’s ira’s. i always socked the limit into those, and soon opened an ira, as well as a 401k and a roth when they became available. i also opened fidelity and later, vanguard, mutual fund accounts. i always saved more than i spent, probably at least half my pay, which was never higher than about $65k during all the years i worked in journalism. true, my friends always liked to joke that i was “cheap,” but who’s laughing now? i crossed the $1m line in late 04, quit full-time work at age 51 and do exactly as i please with myself today, which is mainly being a semi-pro musician, the career the i almost established when i was in college. mercifully, i don’t have to live off it today. my main advice is to avoid credit-card debt. i am always astonished by how much people carry. ive never carried any. my debts are always limited to mortgage and, at times, car loans. i could own fancier cars and houses, but i have never felt the need, unlike my cash rich, but investment-poor friends. i live off corporate junk bonds today, plus music and random freelancing. my goal is to get to about $1.5m, get 80 percennt out of today’s way too unstable stock market, and live off mostly fixed income investments. way down the road, ill add social security, and a pension from the 25-years-plus i worked in newspapers. it can be done. the millionaire-next-door exists all around us.
Find your niche partners, collaborators, and champions: As you’re creating your course, look for notable people who are also creating content in the space. Look att how their businesses operate and incorporate that into your own plan. You can also reach out to any influencers and make them affiliates for your own course. This way, they’ll be incentivized to share your content with their own audiences (which can be a major way to generate your first sales—it helps if you're using one of the best CRMs for small business—and start building your own community!)

Disagree with the photography idea. It may seem easy but there are those of us who have spent, in my case 10 + years learning the light, the technical aspects, the right way to pose… we have to keep pushing our prices higher because there are more people starting to eat away at the client base by undercutting…. and we’re trying to make money and feed families too. It only hurts an industry to undercut. Sorry. Good list otherwise, don’t do it as an expense to others.
If you live near a university, there are likely all sorts of research studies looking for participants. While I was an undergrad at Virginia Tech, I got paid $500 to participate in a 6-week dietary study. The study provided all my meals and paid me, but I had to eat a 5,000 calorie diet of 50% fat for 6 weeks, plus I had multiple muscle biopsies, urine/blood testing, etc.
To test these websites, you’ll be asked to visit the site in question and record your reactions and thoughts as you go through it. To get started making extra money online by testing websites, sign up for some of the most popular services like UserTesting.com, Userlytics, TryMyUI, Userfeel, TestingTime (for people outside the U.S), or Side Income Jobs.
Next, you need to set up and build your YouTube channel. Your YouTube channel is your homebase for all your content. If you already have a Google account for Gmail or Google Drive, then you can use that to log-in to YouTube and start setting up your channel. Pick a username that works for you and is memorable (if you’re using an existing Google account you’ll have to edit your username in Google+).
Great list! I have another to consider that I personally have 35+ years experience providing. Clean up litter outside commercial properties on foot using inexpensive hand tools. It’s almost as easy to do as going for a walk! I started doing this as a side gig in 1981 and soon grew it into a profitable full-time business. I share my experience in my book, Cleanlots.
The principles that I have followed out of grad school seems to have correspond to the article. At my age as part of the mid-end of the gen X, it seems that reaching the status of millionaire doesn’t reduce the anxiety of how to provide for the family. I still worry about the same things as before, but at perhaps at a different level. I admit getting to the first million was relatively easy with luck and good planning, but I thought I would have been much better off by now. It is also very tough to maintain with a bad economy. Forget about buying the Lamborghini or the large estate, it’s time to hold what you have.

It really is that easy, and I think a lot of people don’t realize that. It’s just a psychological barrier nowadays since many can’t imagine what having $1 million feels like. In reality, $1 million isn’t that much money anymore. That might sound ridiculous, but I know I’m going to need much more than $1 million to retire someday. I’m not sure what my millionaire story will be yet, but I’m certain it’s going to involve self-employment since and not a job.
Keep in mind though, you don’t need a website to do sponsored content since you can also get paid if you have a lot of social media followers. My wife has a pretty big Instagram following, and she gets all kinds of sponsorships. Not only does she get paid in cash, but we get a lot of free stuff, too. We’ve received free rugs, free lights, and free carpet cleaners. She only promotes things she loves though, so this strategy works really well for her.
Your journey to becoming rich might not be linear. Much a like a road trip, there could be some roadblocks or traffic along the way and things that halt your journey or slow you down. However, if you’re committed to getting rich, you have to develop persistence. If you stay the course, you’re more likely to learn how to build wealth and reach your goals.
Yes, I went to bartending school after I graduated from college. When I didn’t get any job interviews, and my meager savings were drying up I needed a quick solution to make money for the rent. Five days later and $495 lighter, I graduated bartending school. I never poured a drink – I found a programming job the same week I was supposed to start bartending at a golf club.
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