Something many self-made wealthy people have in common is that they are valuable in specific ways. Even when millionaires and billionaires are taken out of the equation, many rich people — doctors, engineers, filmmakers — have gotten rich after adding value to themselves and then adding value to the world. For example, a rich neurosurgeon may be specially talented and skilled. This surgeon added value to the world after improving their own skills and quality of life.
With $2 million dollars still in the bank, he thought he was invincible. Fast forward 22 months later, and with just $4,000 left in his account, the walls were closing in on him. I'm all-to familiar with that feeling of despair and anxiety, of sheer and utter pain and panic, that it really hit home for me, as I know it does for others. The truth is that it's easy to make friends when you're riding high, but when you fall from grace and everyone around you disappears, you realize the importance of things like family and health over monetary achievements.
It sounds a bit like a cliche, doesn't it? Just add value, and everything will be better. But how many people do you really think go out there into the world with the desire to add massive amounts of value? Clearly, many people are out there to do the least amount of work for the greatest return. That mindset is born from the id. It's instinctive, and hidden within the far reaches of our subconscious mind. Overcoming that is a hurdle, but a very necessary one to make.
People are always looking to have their cars washed and detailed. You could be a mobile car washer and detailer without having a permanent location. Reach out to people you know or make some flyers and put it in your neighbors' mailboxes. If you want to get serious about it, prop up a one-page website or give out business cards. You can make money quickly doing this.
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