Avoid purchases that are likely to depreciate rapidly. Spending $50,000 on a car is sometimes considered a waste because it's likely that it won't be worth half that much in five years, regardless of how much work you put into it. As soon as you drive a new car off the lot, it depreciates about 20%-25% in value and continues to do so each year you own it. [2] That makes buying a car a very important financial decision.
Break up with your credit card. Did you know that people who use credit cards for purchases end up spending more money than people who use cash?[6] That's because parting with cash is painful. Using a credit card doesn't carry that much of a sting. If you can, divorce your credit card and see how it feels to pay with cash. You'll probably end up saving a boatload of money.
That might be why we have on-demand everything. We live in a society where fast food is prevalent and exists on nearly every corner or town across the United States and we're able to access all of the world's information in real time from anywhere we want from little pocket super computers. We can hail rides, find dates and do everything in a flash, instantaneously. Clearly, we want to lose weight and get right quickly and not have to wait, purely because our ids are so powerful.
The average Uber driver is said to make about $19 to $21 an hour after tolls and some other expenses are factored in — although I’ve seen other numbers suggesting it’s closer to $16, and with Lyft, the average is said to be less (closer to $11). But on the plus side, you can generally get your money instantly, which wasn’t always the case with these ride-sharing businesses.
Manage social media for businesses. If you have a knack for social media, you could potentially get paid to manage various platforms for others. Many businesses are too busy running day-to-day operations to stay on top of their Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest accounts – and will pay someone with the knowledge and time to do it for them. To find these jobs, ask local businesses and check sites like UpWork.com and Problogger.net.

The folly of youth is believing that there's always enough time for everything. Youngsters often believe that retirement, or wealth building, is something that comes later in life, and are more preoccupied with the concerns of the now. Unfortunately, this often leads to a cycle of "Oh, I should do that next month," month after month, until before you know it, you're 10 years older and you've missed out on a decade's worth of compounding interest. The first step is to stop procrastinating; saving and investing is scary, but the longer you wait to do it, the fewer advantages you have.
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