According to Lynne Norris of NorrisBusinessSolutions.com, who works out of her home in Pennsylvania as a virtual assistant, the rates for VAs run about $25 to $75 or more an hour, though ZipRecruiter calculates the average hourly rate at $19. According to Norris, the startup costs of this work from home job can range from about $500 to $1,000, assuming you have an up-to-date computer and printer.
Invest your savings smartly: You have full control over your spending, at least if you can control your emotions and avoid stupid purchases. It’s a lot different when it comes to investments. There are many factors beyond your control, from market trends to other people involved. That’s why the most frequent way of going from rich to poor is not lavish spending (except for lottery winners), but bad investments. Putting your money in a mutual fund is very far from smart investing. You don’t have to be a full‑time investor (since you have a daily job), but you have to be extremely smart about who you trust to manage your money. As we said, you must become financially literate.

Becoming a millionaire is such a popular topic. However, sometimes we overlook living a fulfilled life and just want that label, millionaire. We must endeavor to live a productive life by seeking to better those around us. If you have the vision, create a product, pump in passion and deliver to make things better for people. That is one sure way of becoming a millionaire. Most of the million dollar persons we hear of today have added value to people’s lives: Bill Gates, Sergey Brin, Larry Page and Me, Mcneri! Add value, live your life and IT WILL COME.


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I truly believe that if you want to attain the status of being a millionaire, one must make the necessary adjustments in life. The status of being a millionaire entails a lot of sacrifices but what is more realistic is that it is achievable and doable. More than anything else, be a millionaire for it takes to be one – frugal, investment conscious, earning more than what you spend, paying yourself first, diversifying your investments by not putting all your eggs in one basket alone, intuitive, resourcefull, sound knowledge in financial language and accounts, passionate, loves what you are doing, charitable, innovative, seizing initiatives in the market plays, delaying instant gratification and always never sacrificing the needs of your family in terms of financial needs and matters.
Not all millionaires are frugal. However, many of those who are self-made millionaires practice some form of frugality. Even billionaires like Warren Buffett have some frugal habits. Frugality is about look for ways to get the best value for your money. It doesn’t always mean getting the cheapest thing; it’s more about the best value. It also means that you don’t waste your money on things that you don’t need or want. Practicing frugality can help you keep more of your money for the future.
I’m really torn here. As a writer, I sympathize with you. I’ve looked again and again into freelancing, and consistently find that the rates other people are willing to work for make it an insulting waste of my time. (Like, $10/hour is what a 15-year-old babysitter makes, not a professional writer.) On the other hand, you really can’t ask others to not compete with you. On the plus side, in my (limited) experience, you do get what you pay for most of the time. My sister had a less-expensive wedding photographer, and she was definitely less than happy with the results. So …
The folly of youth is believing that there's always enough time for everything. Youngsters often believe that retirement, or wealth building, is something that comes later in life, and are more preoccupied with the concerns of the now. Unfortunately, this often leads to a cycle of "Oh, I should do that next month," month after month, until before you know it, you're 10 years older and you've missed out on a decade's worth of compounding interest. The first step is to stop procrastinating; saving and investing is scary, but the longer you wait to do it, the fewer advantages you have.
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