Monetize a hobby. While some hobbies actually cost money, others can be transformed into a profitable business venture. Ultimately, it depends on what your hobby is and how talented you are. You could turn your love of photography, for example, into a part-time gig taking family portraits and wedding photos or selling prints on Etsy or at arts fairs.

If you pick up a side job at some fast-food restaurant or department store and start today, it’ll probably be up to a month before you get your first paycheck. You work two weeks, and two weeks later, the check comes in. Maybe you’d get paid sooner — but in my experience, when I’ve needed cash quickly, it’s better to be pessimistic and plan for the worst and hope for the best.
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I’m a huge fan of blogging because I love writing and connecting with people all over the world. To give you an idea of what is possible with blogging, DollarSprout.com is part of a group of blogs that routinely brings in over $100,000 a month in revenue. While it takes time to build your blog up to that income level, you can get the initial set up done in under 30 minutes (no experience needed).
The last step resides in the concept of contribution. Even if you have no money, find a way to contribute to others. Look for opportunities where you can help those around you. Whether they're in need or not, this mindset will drive home the point that you have more than you need, even if you physically don't. Search for ways, every single day, where you can contribute either your time or your money to those who might be less fortunate, because that's the true essence of success in every form.
And while you’ve probably heard of selling sperm or eggs, don’t get your hopes up: Yes, the young and the healthy can sometimes earn good money as sperm or egg donors, but such opportunities require extensive screenings and long-term commitments. Donating blood (sans plasma), meanwhile, is a great and altruistic thing to do, but you generally won’t get money for it.
If you have a knack for organization, you can make money online as a virtual assistant helping people to keep their days in order. A virtual assistant will do everyinthing from bookkeeping to research, database entry, booking travel, and managing email. It can also be an awesome way to rub shoulders with some very important people, build up your professional network, and of course grow another stream of income. You can find great gigs on UpWork, Fiverr, Indeed, and Remote.co.
People are always looking to have their cars washed and detailed. You could be a mobile car washer and detailer without having a permanent location. Reach out to people you know or make some flyers and put it in your neighbors' mailboxes. If you want to get serious about it, prop up a one-page website or give out business cards. You can make money quickly doing this.
Dennis cautions what not to do if you want/hope to be rich, and he provides plenty of real life examples of what he experienced to help provide you a solid understanding of what the path looks like once you are on it and just experienced a windfall. He surmises as do many other rich people like him, not surprisingly, that most of the path to riches is paved by those who ACT. He shares that's something that fewer than 2% of the population do for the things that they WANT...and he thinks that most of you won't act and won't get rich.
It wasn't just the money, but more so, what that money symbolized. It was his ticket to something bigger and greater. He had discovered how to arbitrage in the real estate market by flipping contracts. Today, he's one of the world's most astute house flippers, but also a brilliant industry leader. He took what he learned by arbitraging in real estate, and created an entire real estate SaaS and training business, Real Estate Worldwide, around it, which currently has over 22,000 members.

Join a startup accelerator: Another great option is to apply to a startup accelerator like Y Combinator, 500 startups, or TechStars, where a group of investors will help coach you, connect you with potential partners, and provide startup cash in return for a small stake in your company. The competition is tough to get into these, so don’t rely on them as your only path forward.


Invest your savings smartly: You have full control over your spending, at least if you can control your emotions and avoid stupid purchases. It’s a lot different when it comes to investments. There are many factors beyond your control, from market trends to other people involved. That’s why the most frequent way of going from rich to poor is not lavish spending (except for lottery winners), but bad investments. Putting your money in a mutual fund is very far from smart investing. You don’t have to be a full‑time investor (since you have a daily job), but you have to be extremely smart about who you trust to manage your money. As we said, you must become financially literate.

Reduce your utility bills. Electricity, gas, and other utilities can deeply impact your monthly budget if you let them. So don't. Be smart about ways to keep your home cool during the summer and warm during winter. You may even consider investing in or building solar panels to channel the sun's natural energy into electricity. Keep your utilities low, and watch the money you save start to mount.

While droves of individuals salivate over the ability to live, work and play anywhere in the world that they chose to, most are primarily fixated on the ability to just earn a bit of money online. One stream of revenue would likely make the world of difference to many folks. But doing that seems to be an ever-increasing technical challenge. So it isn't about getting rich for a large degree of people, but rather, finding a way to earn just a little bit more money without all the added time it might take.


Whether you want to become your own boss, start a side hustle, or earn extra money on the side, any of the strategies listed above can help. By finding ways to increase your income, you can free up more cash to pay down debt, save for the future, or invest for retirement. Saving money is only half of the equation. And if you truly want to get ahead, you might want to figure out how to make money – and hopefully, lots of it.
Try Uber EATS or DoorDash. Uber EATS offers part-time work that’s similar to driving for Uber or Lyft. Instead of picking up passengers, however, you will pick up food orders and deliver them in your area. Pay works similarly, letting you earn a per-job rate plus tips. DoorDash works similarly, letting consumers order food from restaurants and connecting drivers to pick up and drop off their meals.
Become a virtual assistant. Virtual assistants perform a wide range of services for their clients, all of which can be completed online. Depending on the day, they may open and reply to emails, schedule online work or blog posts, write mock-up letters and proposals, or perform data entry. You can look for virtual assistant jobs on sites like UpWork.com and Problogger.net.

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I recently stumbled on the Trim app and I have to say, this one is a game changer. It’s a simple app that acts as your own personal financial manager. Once you link your bank to the app, Trim analyzes your spending, finds subscriptions you need to cancel, negotiates your Comcast bill, finds you better car insurance, and more. And of course, the app is free! My bet is that it will only take a few days for Trim to put an extra $100 in your pocket. So easy!

Not all millionaires are frugal. However, many of those who are self-made millionaires practice some form of frugality. Even billionaires like Warren Buffett have some frugal habits. Frugality is about look for ways to get the best value for your money. It doesn’t always mean getting the cheapest thing; it’s more about the best value. It also means that you don’t waste your money on things that you don’t need or want. Practicing frugality can help you keep more of your money for the future.
Become a virtual assistant. Virtual assistants perform a wide range of services for their clients, all of which can be completed online. Depending on the day, they may open and reply to emails, schedule online work or blog posts, write mock-up letters and proposals, or perform data entry. You can look for virtual assistant jobs on sites like UpWork.com and Problogger.net.
If it’s not clear yet, information and expertise are two of the most consistent and lucrative ways to make extra money online. If you don’t like talking on the phone, you can sign up to get paid to answer professional questions on JustAnswer. There are thousands of questions being asked every month from people looking for help from lawyers, doctors, mechanics, vets, and more. To apply, you’ll need to supply your professional verification, resume, and a form of identification.
Hunt for under-priced used books that you can sell online. Download an app that reads ISBN numbers so you can scan the barcodes on books. This will pull up the book’s current price on Amazon so you can see if it’s worth trying to resell it. Then, visit used book stores, thrift stores, and garage sales to look for high value books. Post the books for sale online using sites like Amazon or Ebay.[9]
There are plenty of books on making money by men who haven't made much. But if J. Paul Getty, who Fortune magazine called “the richest man in the world,” doesn't know how, who does? Here the billionaire businessman discloses the secrets of his success—and provides a blueprint for those who want to follow in his footsteps. And he goes beyond the matter of making money to the question of what to do with it.

Individuals who cannot get approved for loans through traditional financial institutions and lenders often turn to alternate sources of financing such as peer-to-peer lending. Because these tend to be higher-risk loans, interest rates typically range from 6 to 10 percent. You can use programs like Lending Club to get involved with peer-to-peer lending quickly and easily.
Logan is a CPA with a Masters Degree in Taxation from the University of Southern California. He has been featured in publications such as CNBC, USA Today, U.S. News & World Report, and HuffPost on topics ranging from paying down debt to using credit card points to saving money on taxes. After spending nearly 10 years in public accounting, including 5 with professional services firm Ernst & Young where he consulted with multinational companies and high net worth individuals on their tax situations, he launched Money Done Right in 2017 to communicate modern ideas on earning, saving, and investing money.
There are plenty of books on making money by men who haven't made much. But if J. Paul Getty, who Fortune magazine called “the richest man in the world,” doesn't know how, who does? Here the billionaire businessman discloses the secrets of his success—and provides a blueprint for those who want to follow in his footsteps. And he goes beyond the matter of making money to the question of what to do with it.
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