I have a question. I am 24 and I just started selling commercial insurance. My wife and I have about 70 k in student loans which we plan on paying back asap. I am going to have an additional 10k on top of my salary next year which I plan on saving until the end of the year and allocating it as I see fit. Everything I read says “compounding interest is the bomb” but then says “don’t save, pay down debt”. Now, I hate debt but I want to take full advantage of our young age and compounding interest. What would you recommend I do with extra 10k if we already put and extra $200 towards debt a month and we have an emegency fund in place? Fully Fund our IRA’s for the year or pay down a loan? I feel like there is no right or wrong answer. Your thoughts?
Starting a podcast, like making a YouTube channel or blog, comes down to telling interesting stories and building an engaged audience. I’m probably sounding like a broken record by now, but you need a niche that you’re interested in and there’s already a demand for. Come up with a list of topics you’d like to talk about and then search iTunes charts, Google Trends and other podcast research sites like cast.market to see what’s currently out there and popular.
Tim, I know several millionaires, and most of them have done it the old fashioned way, which is working and saving over many years. Some have started their own businesses, some have made wealth through other means such as investments and real estate, and some have done it other ways. Virtually all of the millionaires I know have families (some were married without children, but most had children). I’ve never counted how many millionaires I know, but of the people I know for certain, I would venture to say that I know at least 10-15 of them would qualify under these standards. As for the college education part of it, I’ve never taken a poll to find out how many had degrees and which degree they had, if they had one.

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Set up a roadside stand. Depending on where you live, you could profit handsomely by setting up a roadside stand. If you live near a resort area, for example, you could buy cases of bottled water, put them on ice, and sell them to passers by for twice what you paid. Selling fruit and produce you grow yourself is also a smart idea in highly-traveled areas.
If you love to travel and find yourself randomly searching for airfare sales or browsing Lonely Planet, why not carve out a niche for yourself as a private travel agent? My friend, Mark Jackson did just that, making extra money online with his travel consulting side business. Start with word of mouth recommendations from friends who know they can count on you for the cheapest flights, and then move on and create a Facebook or LinkedIn group to invite people who want to stay on top of the latest deals. Eventually you could spin this into a full-time consultancy teaching people how to make their dream trip a reality.

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Yes, I went to bartending school after I graduated from college. When I didn’t get any job interviews, and my meager savings were drying up I needed a quick solution to make money for the rent. Five days later and $495 lighter, I graduated bartending school. I never poured a drink – I found a programming job the same week I was supposed to start bartending at a golf club.
And while you’ve probably heard of selling sperm or eggs, don’t get your hopes up: Yes, the young and the healthy can sometimes earn good money as sperm or egg donors, but such opportunities require extensive screenings and long-term commitments. Donating blood (sans plasma), meanwhile, is a great and altruistic thing to do, but you generally won’t get money for it.

all your advice works. i know because i have followed those steps since my early to mid-20s when, as a self-employed freelance journalist, i opened what was then called a keough account. those were pre-cursors of today’s ira’s. i always socked the limit into those, and soon opened an ira, as well as a 401k and a roth when they became available. i also opened fidelity and later, vanguard, mutual fund accounts. i always saved more than i spent, probably at least half my pay, which was never higher than about $65k during all the years i worked in journalism. true, my friends always liked to joke that i was “cheap,” but who’s laughing now? i crossed the $1m line in late 04, quit full-time work at age 51 and do exactly as i please with myself today, which is mainly being a semi-pro musician, the career the i almost established when i was in college. mercifully, i don’t have to live off it today. my main advice is to avoid credit-card debt. i am always astonished by how much people carry. ive never carried any. my debts are always limited to mortgage and, at times, car loans. i could own fancier cars and houses, but i have never felt the need, unlike my cash rich, but investment-poor friends. i live off corporate junk bonds today, plus music and random freelancing. my goal is to get to about $1.5m, get 80 percennt out of today’s way too unstable stock market, and live off mostly fixed income investments. way down the road, ill add social security, and a pension from the 25-years-plus i worked in newspapers. it can be done. the millionaire-next-door exists all around us.
The other wants to make money because it allows them to make more things. They want to improve their products. They want to extend their lines. They want to create another book, another song, another movie. They love what they make and they see making money as a way to do even more of what they love. They dream of building a company that makes the best things possible... and making money is the way to fuel that dream and build that company they love.
Pretty self-explanatory. You can start making money playing with dogs today using Rover. Rover lets you set your prices so you can charge fair rates for your services. In addition to walking, you can also offer doggy daycare, house sitting, and boarding through Rover. If you’d rather start your own thing, check out The Balance’s How to Start a Dog Walking Business.
Become a babysitter if you are good with children. There are websites that will connect you with people who need a babysitter. To get hired by people who do not know you, it will help to pass a CPR class, or to have a special talent or expertise for entertaining children. However, you might be able to make money more quickly just by babysitting for people you know, or by having friends refer you to others who need a babysitter.[13]
With the economic crisis, people are happy to have any kind of job, even the ones that don't pay well. However, there are challenging jobs where you will be assigned in places where living is hard because of the climate, crime rate, and civil unrest. Jobs like this will reward you with a six-figure salary and free housing, as well as, travel opportunities.

Keep in mind though, you don’t need a website to do sponsored content since you can also get paid if you have a lot of social media followers. My wife has a pretty big Instagram following, and she gets all kinds of sponsorships. Not only does she get paid in cash, but we get a lot of free stuff, too. We’ve received free rugs, free lights, and free carpet cleaners. She only promotes things she loves though, so this strategy works really well for her.
Now that Mr. Dennis has died, I'll add my review. He spends the first two-thirds of the book telling you why you probably do NOT really want to get rich. He's quite convincing, and he convinced me of what I already sensed: I don't care enough about the benefits of riches to pay the price to be wealthy. I already have all I need. But I read the rest of the book anyway, because he's an entertaining writer.
Hi Danielle – I presume you have a website or blog? If so, the easiest way to start is by signing up for an affiliate site, like Commission Junction. They represent hundreds of companies offering affiliate programs. But you can also contact companies directly, preferably those who’s products and services you actually use. Most company’s have affiliate programs now, so you can try signing up that way. They’ll give you a coded link to place on your site that will credit you for the sale when a reader clicks through to their site and makes a purchase.
I fear your wonderful advice comes too late for me. I am 58 years old and have no job skills. The world is a wonderful place for you young people who have jobs and a meaningful life, but for someone like me it is difficult to want to keep going. I feel antiquated and out-of-date. I will never be a millionaire–not even close! What is even worse is that my two grown sons can only find part-time, minimum wage jobs and both of them went to college.
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