all your advice works. i know because i have followed those steps since my early to mid-20s when, as a self-employed freelance journalist, i opened what was then called a keough account. those were pre-cursors of today’s ira’s. i always socked the limit into those, and soon opened an ira, as well as a 401k and a roth when they became available. i also opened fidelity and later, vanguard, mutual fund accounts. i always saved more than i spent, probably at least half my pay, which was never higher than about $65k during all the years i worked in journalism. true, my friends always liked to joke that i was “cheap,” but who’s laughing now? i crossed the $1m line in late 04, quit full-time work at age 51 and do exactly as i please with myself today, which is mainly being a semi-pro musician, the career the i almost established when i was in college. mercifully, i don’t have to live off it today. my main advice is to avoid credit-card debt. i am always astonished by how much people carry. ive never carried any. my debts are always limited to mortgage and, at times, car loans. i could own fancier cars and houses, but i have never felt the need, unlike my cash rich, but investment-poor friends. i live off corporate junk bonds today, plus music and random freelancing. my goal is to get to about $1.5m, get 80 percennt out of today’s way too unstable stock market, and live off mostly fixed income investments. way down the road, ill add social security, and a pension from the 25-years-plus i worked in newspapers. it can be done. the millionaire-next-door exists all around us.

Jean Paul Getty was an American industrialist and founder of the Getty Oil Company. In 1957 Fortune magazine named him the richest living American, and the 1966 Guinness Book of Records named him the world’s richest private citizen, worth nearly 9 billion dollars in today’s money. He was the author of several books, including the bestselling How to Be Rich, and his autobiography, As I See It. He died in 1976.
I see we have the same mindset. I really believe I’ll be a millionaire in the future, and I’ve been working toward that for many years now. From time to time something can happen unexpected and cause you to have to spend a little more than you earn… you can’t make a habit of doing that though. This was a good article, and should help a lot of people if they will just do it.
27. Sponsored/paid posts – Many blogs publish sponsored and paid posts. Sponsored posts are basically just posts about a specific brand, product or service. A company will pay you to publish an article about it. It’s similar with other paid posts as well. Your basically selling the spot for the article on your site. If you decide to take this route, you’ll want to build your traffic before you will get many offers.
It’s no different with blogging. Less than 1 % earn really good money out of it. Ramit Sethi, for example. Then there are some people who are making a decent living out of it. But the vast majority of bloggers earn zero dollars. The statistics suck, but that’s the name of the game, if you want to earn money with fame. You must get in the top 10 %, or even better in the top 1%.
Donating plasma can actually work out better than selling your blood.  It takes longer to donate plasma because they will put your red blood cells back in your system. The upside is that you can donate plasma as much as twice a week and you can make anywhere from $40-$60 per donation. You can make that $100 in less than a week if you can stomach the needle.
I couldn’t disagree more. The concept of systematic saving and hoping for a solid average return in the markets isn’t something that I believe in anymore. I’m 32, and have been investing in the markets since I was 18, under the assumption that if I set up automatic contributions throughout my life I would ultimately be “rich”. I started by maxing out my SEP-IRA and then by maxing my Roth. I invest monthly in a range of products, again, all with the goal of cost averaging the market to my benefit over time. Fast forward 14 years from when I began, and I have accumulated less than $60k. My invested dollar amount exceeds my current total, as it did even at the recent market highs in 2007. In other words, investing for the long haul doesn’t work like it used to, particularly for my generation. The first decade of wage earning is the most important in terms of compounding interest, and we have just experienced a completely lost decade. The hopes for recovery to make up for that lost decade (14 yrs in my case) do not appear reasonable. David

Do you have a knack for writing or a background in development? There are thousands of freelance jobs available for people of all different areas of expertise. Sites like Upwork or Freelancer allow you to create a profile of what you bring to the table, and you can either apply for applicable jobs or get seeked out by people looking for freelancers.
There is no money made without a risk taken. Whether it’s starting a business or investing in stocks, every avenue to making money requires some risk. Even selling your old furniture requires you taking the risk that the buyer will show up and will pay you. It is a comparatively small risk when compared to deciding whether to spend millions of dollars on a new product line, but it is still a risk.
Use your bank’s overdraft protection if you need to make a purchase. If you have a checking or other account with overdraft protection, you might be able to intentionally overdraw on the account and take advantage of the temporary payment, when you are in need of quick cash. The bank will initially cover the cost, but you will have to pay it back.[27]

If you’re looking for inspiration, my friend Michelle Schroeder-Gardner of the website Making Sense of Sense has become the expert on all things affiliate marketing. Michelle earns more than $100,000 per month from her blog and the bulk of her income comes from affiliate sales. Michelle has had so much success with affiliate marketing that she even has her own course called Making Sense of Affiliate Marketing.
For that reason, the story of an iconic online marketing legend and founder of, Real Estate World Wide (REWW), Kent Clothier, is one of the most inspirational modern-day fables about, not just attaining wealth at the highest levels, but also in reinvention, revitalization and the ability to produce multiple streams of revenue even when you're emotionally and spiritually bankrupt. This is an individual who played an integral role in building up a nearly $2-billion-dollar-per-year grocery-arbitrage business, but then walked away from it at 30-years old with no ownership retention.
×