What a huge, great list of ideas – bookmarked this as I know I’ll be coming back to go over it again and again. Here’s another item that could have made the list. I found a financial directory that’s useful for info on making money online. It’s http://money.madbeetech.com. What I like about it is that each directory listing includes ebooks and videos that can be instantly downloaded. All sorts of stuff for people who have their own website, and people who don’t (but still want to make money online).
People are always looking to have their cars washed and detailed. You could be a mobile car washer and detailer without having a permanent location. Reach out to people you know or make some flyers and put it in your neighbors' mailboxes. If you want to get serious about it, prop up a one-page website or give out business cards. You can make money quickly doing this.

A second topic I really like is the fallacy of the great idea. You do not need some great, original idea to be successful. Really all you need to do is take an existing idea and put a new spin on it. Do it better than anyone else. Combine two existing ideas that have not been combined so far. Take a look at Mcdonalds. They do not make the best hamburger in the world. They are not even close. But they do the whole process better than anyone else. The idea is not important, the proper execution of the idea is where the money lies.

Start by taking other courses you’re interested in: Not only is this important competitor and opportunity analysis, but it also gives you an idea of how a course could or should look and feel. What’s the pacing like? Is it via email, video, in-person chats? Once you understand how you want your course to look, it’s time to decide what it should include. Those same courses are a great starting place. How can you make your course better or more interesting? Do you have experience others don’t?


The Id -- The id is the first part of the human mind that's formed. It's the basal and instinctive urges that drive us towards instant gratification, and it's hardwired into our genetic conditioning to eat, procreate and defecate, for example. The id creates the sudden urges of wanting what we want, and wanting it right now. Children are all born with the id until the other parts form, and if we were only left with the id, we would do, act, and say as we pleased all the time and anytime.


In 2014, Caitlin Pyle made over $43,000 by working as a freelance proofreader…part time. When she wasn’t working, she even had time to go on several fun vacations. After she had a ton of success doing that, she decided she wanted to teach others how to do the same thing, so she started up Proofread Anywhere. Sign up for one of her free workshops to learn more about making money as a proofreader.
For non-tech people (myself included), web design can cause a lot of stress. And stress means opportunity. If you have a knack for web design or web development, you should definitely be capitalizing on it. And since it’s such a foreign concept for many, it can be a really lucrative side hustle. You can find all sorts of gigs on Upwork. Also, you need to read this article: How to Make $5,000+ a Month Building Websites Part-Time
Ask a smart guy for tips on how to get rich quick, and he will tell you to invest in the stock market. Choose stocks wisely and use your dividends to invest in more stocks. This will help you build a fortune. Although there would be times stocks are unstable, once you become an expert in trading, you can detect the changes in advance to keep your earnings at bay. Make stock market crashes work for you by taking the opportunity to buy more stocks when they are priced low.
For that reason, the story of an iconic online marketing legend and founder of, Real Estate World Wide (REWW), Kent Clothier, is one of the most inspirational modern-day fables about, not just attaining wealth at the highest levels, but also in reinvention, revitalization and the ability to produce multiple streams of revenue even when you're emotionally and spiritually bankrupt. This is an individual who played an integral role in building up a nearly $2-billion-dollar-per-year grocery-arbitrage business, but then walked away from it at 30-years old with no ownership retention.
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