Thank you for all the advice you offer. Im only 23 years old and stumbled upon your writing on debt management a few months ago and have already reduced my debt by 30%. People may knit pick at what you say but the underlining is always the same…less debt+saving and investing leads financial freedom. I look forward to continuing to read what you have to say and making these millions with you brother.
5. Fiverr – Fiverr is a great place to make a few bucks or spend a few bucks if you need some of the services people offer. Basically, everything is $5. You either pay $5 or charge $5. They call them “gigs.” You can offer your services however you choose. If you sell art and you’re fine selling pieces for $5 each, that’s a gig. If you’re a graphic designer and you want to offer your services for $10/hour, simply offer a 30 minute gig. If they need two hours of graphic design, they pay you $20, or $10/hour by buying four gigs.
Track down your expenses. To soar your efficiency on cutting your expenses, it is vital to keep track of them. Pick one of the numerous expense tracking applications there are around, like Money Lover or Mint, and record every single penny that goes in and out of your wallet. After 3 months or so, you should be able to know where most of your money go and what can you do for that.
Hi Danielle – I presume you have a website or blog? If so, the easiest way to start is by signing up for an affiliate site, like Commission Junction. They represent hundreds of companies offering affiliate programs. But you can also contact companies directly, preferably those who’s products and services you actually use. Most company’s have affiliate programs now, so you can try signing up that way. They’ll give you a coded link to place on your site that will credit you for the sale when a reader clicks through to their site and makes a purchase.
Getaround is the sharing economy's answer to rental agencies. The company allows you to rent out your car on an hourly or daily basis, starting at $5 an hour. Depending on your vehicle's market value, you set the price per hour, and Getaround takes a 40% cut to cover 24/7 roadside assistance and driver insurance. According to the Getaround, earning potential for renting your car when you're not using it is up to $1,000 a year.

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It's really easy to look at certain strategies and techniques in business or in life that will help you make monumental leaps forward, financially speaking. But that doesn't take into account one of the most important ingredients for success. If you're serious about succeeding at the highest level, be grateful. Not tomorrow. Not in a few weeks when you get a raise. Right now. In this very moment. Why? Because it could all disappear in an instant. Appreciate what you have while striving for more.

I started reading your e-newsletter since I found out about you from Mo Money Podcast. I love this content and I can tell you what my side hustle is that was not mentioned here. I have been a virtual translator via Upwork (freelancing platform). Since I’m originally from Japan, I started offering beginner to intermediate level translation last year. Since then, I have delivered over 6 dozens projects all satisfactorily. I like that each and every project is so unique and it really stimulates my brain and challenge myself to deliver high quality translation services. My hope is that one day when I get pregnant or want to stay home with my babies, I can just do this freelancing job and quit my 9-5 job. Upwork offers so many types of freelancing jobs other than translation, so I recommend to anyone who wants to capitalize their underutilized talents.
Look, I know it’s not always realistic to pull these off; I personally wouldn’t bother trying. But if you’ve got a ton of stuff lying around — not outright junk, but stuff you don’t need, like the aforementioned DVDs and kid’s clothes — it’s worth a try. Advertise on Craigslist and put up signs in your neighborhood, then come Saturday haul a table out to your driveway (assuming you have a driveway), load it up with stuff for sale, and take whatever you can get.
Seek a payday loan or title loan as a last resort. Companies that offer payday and title loan services typically offer extremely high interest rates (sometimes with percentages in the hundreds). If you cannot pay the loan and any interest back within the stated timeline, you risk even higher interest costs or, in the case of a title loan, the loss of your car. Avoid these types of loans in all but the direst circumstances, unless you are certain you will be able to pay the loan back.
If you're unfamiliar with the concept of arbitrage, here's how it works. Wikipedia describes an arbitrage as effectively, "the practice of taking advantage of a price difference between two or more markets: striking a combination of matching deals that capitalize upon the imbalance, the profit being the difference between the market prices." Clothier was able to identify arbitrage opportunities in the grocery industry with precision. 
all your advice works. i know because i have followed those steps since my early to mid-20s when, as a self-employed freelance journalist, i opened what was then called a keough account. those were pre-cursors of today’s ira’s. i always socked the limit into those, and soon opened an ira, as well as a 401k and a roth when they became available. i also opened fidelity and later, vanguard, mutual fund accounts. i always saved more than i spent, probably at least half my pay, which was never higher than about $65k during all the years i worked in journalism. true, my friends always liked to joke that i was “cheap,” but who’s laughing now? i crossed the $1m line in late 04, quit full-time work at age 51 and do exactly as i please with myself today, which is mainly being a semi-pro musician, the career the i almost established when i was in college. mercifully, i don’t have to live off it today. my main advice is to avoid credit-card debt. i am always astonished by how much people carry. ive never carried any. my debts are always limited to mortgage and, at times, car loans. i could own fancier cars and houses, but i have never felt the need, unlike my cash rich, but investment-poor friends. i live off corporate junk bonds today, plus music and random freelancing. my goal is to get to about $1.5m, get 80 percennt out of today’s way too unstable stock market, and live off mostly fixed income investments. way down the road, ill add social security, and a pension from the 25-years-plus i worked in newspapers. it can be done. the millionaire-next-door exists all around us.
Remember the steps from point 2: Make more money, spend less, and invest wisely. Point 3 covered making more money, and this one covers spending less. Make a detailed budget for yourself based on your projected income and your current expenses. Set firm limits for your expenses, and keep a close eye on where most of your money goes--you might be surprised at some of the areas where you waste the most money. Once identified, you can start refining your budget to spend as little as possible, and funnel the rest into a savings or investment program.
There is a simple fact that many people miss: you will never grow wealthy if you spend everything you earn. Regardless of how much money you earn, you need to put some aside in savings. Having a cash cushion is nice because it helps you prepare for unexpected expenses and helps you avoid debt. But there is another reason that saving money is important – because of taxes and other factors, money saved is worth more than money earned!
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